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So long, last North American ice sheet

The last remnant of a once-enormous ice sheet will be gone in about 300 years, according to a new study. Scientists say warming temperatures are the reason.

Where’s the moon? Waning crescent

A waning crescent moon is sometimes called an old moon. It’s seen in the east before dawn. Next new moon is March 28 at 02:57 UTC.

Colors of scintillating Venus

Venus reaches inferior conjunction today, officially leaving the evening sky. It has been low in the sky, where Earth’s atmosphere has caused Venus to scintillate, or twinkle, in many colors.

New map of space dust in 3-D

Sure, we’re all collections of space dust. But astronomers also want to study it in order to understand how space dust in our Milky Way obscures starlight from afar.

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Star of the week: Acrux

You have far south on Earth’s globe to see the Southern Cross. Bluish Acrux, aka Alpha Crucis, is its brightest star.

Know the Big and Little Dippers

The Big Dipper is easy. And, once you find it, you can find the Little Dipper, too. Plus … learn how the stars of the Big Dipper are moving in space.

Venus after sunset and before sunrise!

The planet Venus is now appearing in the west after sunset and in the east before sunrise. Don’t believe it? Astronomer Bruce McClure reports on his observation.

Record low sea ice at both poles

Considering both poles in February 2017, Earth essentially lost the equivalent of a chunk of sea ice larger than Mexico, in contrast to the average global minimum for 1981-2010.

Does Mars sometimes have rings?

It’s possible that Mars’ closer moon – Phobos – might alternate between becoming a planetary ring and clumping together to form a moon.

Look for the Crab Nebula

The Crab Nebula, about 6,500 light years from Earth, is the scattered fragments of a supernova, or exploding star. Earthly skywatchers observed it in AD 1054.

Star’s death spiral into black hole

What happens when a star with about our sun’s mass spirals into a black hole? With the distant event known as ASASSN-14li, astronomers have figured out some details.

What is stellar magnitude?

Brightest stars to the eye are 1st magnitude, and dimmest stars to the naked eye are 6th magnitude. How the magnitude scale works in astronomy and why it’s useful.

What makes a pulsar pulse?

Hear the word “pulsar” and wonder what it is? Take 95 seconds to watch this video from NASA Astrophysics.