Sun

Sun news July 15: SDO eclipse season begins today

Animated 4-panel view of the sun with a shadow moving to block it.
Sun news for July 14–15, 2024. The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) began its 29th eclipse season at 7:17 UTC today (July 15, 2024). What’s blocking the sun? It’s the Earth! This sequence shows the eclipse in four wavelengths, 304, 171, 193, and 131 angstroms. Image via SDO and JHelioviewer.

Sun news July 15: SDO eclipse season begins today

Today’s top story: Interesting sun news today! The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) enters its 29th eclipse season. The spacecraft’s inclined geosynchronous orbit around Earth is designed to maximize its time looking at the sun. Still, each year, the spacecraft must experience two periods – lasting 3–4 weeks each – where Earth blocks the sun periodically from the spacecraft’s point of view. The eclipses start at around 30 minutes in length, reach a peak length of about 72 minutes, then decrease again. This sequence will end on August 11 with eclipses down to 30 minutes again. After this, the next SDO eclipse season, #30, will begin on January 10, 2025.
Last 24 hours: In other sun news, solar activity has decreased from high to moderate in the past 24 hours, with M flares. The largest flare of the observation period occurred between 11 UTC yesterday and 11 UTC today, was an M2.7 flare at 9:54 UTC on July 15. The sun released 23 flares, four M flares, and 19 C flares. AR3738 produced the four M flares and 13 C flares. The M flares produced regional radio blackouts. The M flares during the past observation period are:
• M1.0 on July 14 at 21:03 UTC from AR3738 with an R1 radio blackout
• M1.3 on July 15 at 03:55 UTC from AR3738 with an R1 radio blackout
• M2.7 on July 15 at 09:54 UTC from AR3738 with an R1 radio blackout
• M1.9 on July 15 at 10:19 UTC from AR3738 with an R1 radio blackout
AR3738 has maintained its beta-gamma-delta magnetic complexity. Given the region’s X flare and large M flares in the previous 24-hour observation period, the chance for more large flares is high. The sun has 12 numbered active regions. There is one newcomer: AR3852.
Next 24 hours: The chance for C flares is 99%. The chance for M flares is 65% today. The chance for X flares is 15%.
Next expected CME: No Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were found in the available coronagraph imagery.
Current geomagnetic activity: Earth’s magnetic field is quiet at the time of this writing (11 UTC on July 15). The geomagnetic field is likely to continue at quiet levels over July 15–17.

The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with small dark spots.
This image shows sun activity – with the most active regions labeled – as of 0 UTC on July 16, 2024. Original image, without labels, via NASA SDO. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky. Today’s sun is posted by Armando Caussade. Why are east and west on the sun reversed?
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with a mottled surface.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Jim Militello in Tucson, Arizona, captured this filtered image of the sun on July 14, 2024. Jim wrote: “This hydrogen-alpha image of the sun is showing numerous active regions along with sunspots, filaments and prominences.” Thank you, Jim!
The sun, seen as a large white sphere with small dark spots.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Patricio León in Santiago, Chile, captured this filtered image of the sun on July 14, 2024. Patricio wrote: “Active AR3738 is close to exit Earth-directed sun’s face. Numerous minor sunspots will be left behind her.” Thank you, Patricio!

Sun news July 14: BAM! X flare

X flare! AR3738 has been batting below its average until the last 24 hours. It started to pick up its flaring at the end of July 13, with several M flares, including two M5+ flares. Then, early on July 14, BAM! The region released an X1.3 flare. No obvious coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were observed in the available imagery, but regions across Earth experienced shortwave radio blackouts that lasted from a few minutes (from small M flares) up to 30 minutes during the X flare. By the way … happy Bastille Day! Today’s X flare isn’t the first time we’ve recorded Bastille Day fireworks. On July 14, 2000, 24 years ago, the sun released a now-famous eruption. A sunspot region sitting near disk center released a monumental blast. While only releasing an X5.7 flare, the particle storm and CME released were ones for the record books. Learn more about the spectacular day here: The Bastille Day Flare.
Last 24 hours: So the big sun news is that solar activity surged to high in the past day, first with the release of two M5+ flares from AR3738 on July 13, several other smaller M flares on July 13–14, and then an X1.5 flare from AR3738 on July 14. Since yesterday, the region has increased in magnetic complexity from beta-gamma to beta-gamma-delta. Its size has grown to 6.5 times the surface area of Earth. AR3738 produced 14 of 24 flares, including eight of nine M flares and an X flare. The largest flare of the observation period occurred between 11 UTC yesterday and 11 UTC today; there was an X1.3 flare at 2:23 UTC on July 14. The M and X flares during the past observation period are:
• M5.3 on July 13 at 12:21 UTC from AR3738 with an R2 radio blackout
• M1.8 on July 13 at 14:59 UTC from AR3745 with an R1 radio blackout
• M2.0 on July 13 at 15:41 UTC from AR3738 with an R1 radio blackout
• M1.0 on July 13 at 19:25 UTC from AR3738 with an R1 radio blackout
• M5.0 on July 13 at 22:44 UTC from AR3738 with an R2 radio blackout
• M2.7 on July 13 at 23:14 UTC from AR3738 with an R1 radio blackout
• M1.7 on July 14 at 01:05 UTC from AR3738 with an R1 radio blackout
X1.3 on July 14 at 02:23 UTC from AR3738 with an R3 radio blackout
• M1.0 on July 14 at 03:46 UTC from AR3751 with an R1 radio blackout
• M3.0 on July 14 at 04:05 UTC from AR3738 with an R1 radio blackout
• M1.0 on July 14 at 10:16 UTC from AR3738 with an R1 radio blackout
The sun has 11 numbered active regions. There are three newcomers: AR3749, AR3850, and AR3851.

Sun news.
Sun news for July 13-14, 2024. AR33738 has picked up the action over the past 24 hours. It has released multiple M flares, including two M5+ flares and an X1.3 flare on July 14. Images via SDO and jhelioviewer.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with a mottled surface.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Mario Rana in Hampton, Virginia, captured this filtered image on July 13, 2024. Mario wrote: “Hydrogen-alpha image of the sun featuring active region AR3738 along with some nice prominences.” Thank you, Mario!

The sun in recent days

The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with small dark spots.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 2 UTC on July 15, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with small dark spots.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 0 UTC on July 14, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with small dark spots.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 4 UTC on July 13, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with small dark spots.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 0 UTC on July 12, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with small dark spots.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 2 UTC on July 11, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with small dark spots.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 1 UTC on July 10, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with small dark spots.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 0 UTC on July 9, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.

Sun images from our community

The sun, seen as a large white sphere with small dark spots.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Patricio León in Santiago, Chile, captured this filtered image of the sun on July 15, 2024. Patricio wrote: “The sun’s face presents seven major sunspots, including big AR3738 exiting the right limb and the four nuclei string of AR3751 close to 8 o’clock limb. A new conspicuous spot is rotating close to its position, will be visible by tomorrow [July 16].” Thank you, Patricio!
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with a mottled surface.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Mario Rana in Hampton, Virginia, captured this filtered image on July 15, 2024. Mario wrote: “Hydrogen-alpha image of the sun showing numerous sunspot regions.” Thank you, Mario!
The sun, seen as a sectional yellow sphere with small dark spots.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | David Hawkes in Sheffield, United Kingdom, captured this filtered image of the sun on July 15, 2024. David wrote: “Sunny again and a great opportunity to bag a nice collection of sunspots on the sun’s disk, in particular along the solar equator but also north and south with active regions. AR3738 is headed for the exit but there’s no shortage of regions to take its place (newcomer AR3751 and AR3747 look promising).” Thank you, David!
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with a mottled surface.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Jim Militello in Tucson, Arizona, captured this filtered image of the sun on July 14, 2024. Jim wrote: “This hydrogen-alpha image of the sun is showing numerous active regions along with sunspots, filaments, and prominence.” Thank you, Jim!
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with small dark spots.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Jelieta Walinski in St. David, Arizona, captured this filtered image of the sun on July 13, 2024. Jelieta wrote: “This is the sunspot today, July 13, 2024. Taken from our backyard.” Thank you, Jelieta!
A sun close-up, seen as a flat yellow surface with a mottled surface.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Sona Shukla in New Delhi, India, captured this filtered image of the sun on July 11, 2024. Sona wrote: “We are in midst of monsoon season, rare to get the sun not obscured by clouds, ceased this opportunity early morning hours. The solar session yielded some decent result, presenting sunspot 3738 from my bedroom window, anyone who attempts solar imaging would know what it means to be under a shade and imaging in comfort.” Thank you, Sona!

Are you a fan of sun images? We invite you all to send us your beautiful recent photos of sunspots and auroras. We love receiving them and sharing them! And to those of you who’ve already posted a photo to our community page, thank you.

Submit photos here

View community photos here

Bottom line: Sun news for July 15, 2024. The Solar Dynamics Observatory enters its 29th eclipse season. Earth is eclipsing the sun! Sun activity is now moderate, with several M flares.

Posted 
July 15, 2024
 in 
Sun

Like what you read?
Subscribe and receive daily news delivered to your inbox.

Your email address will only be used for EarthSky content. Privacy Policy
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

More from 

C. Alex Young

View All