Sun

Sun news June 24: Super sunspot returns with almost-X flare

Sun news for June 23-24, 2024. A look at the past day’s 4 M flares, 3 from AR3712 and one from AR3723. The first three videos are SDO 131 angstroms and the fourth is GOES SUVI 304 and 171. Images via SDO, NOAA, and JHelioviewer.

Sun news for June 24, 2024: Super sunspot returns with almost-X flare

Today’s top story: The super-sunspot region is back! This will be its third trip across the sun’s visible face. This is the same region that produced the largest X flare of Solar Cycle 25 so far. And this region was one of the major drivers of the great solar superstorm of May 2024. It’s now labeled AR3723, formerly AR3697, formerly AR3664. Over the past day, sun activity reached high levels thanks to a near-X flare (an M9.3) from this returning region, plus three more M flares. The region has not come fully into view, but from an initial look, it does not appear to be as large this third time around. But it’s still carrying a magnetic punch! And that means a potential for more flaring. The other three M flares came from departing region AR3712, which has been one of the major flare producers over the past two weeks. The first two M flares were isolated and the last two were associated with a larger eruption from AR3712. The eruption was largely west-directed. Now we wait to see what AR3723 has in store. Stay tuned!
Last 24 hours: Sun activity reached high levels with the release of the near-X M9.3 flare from the newly labeled region AR3723. Departing region AR3712 produced the other three M flares during our observation period (11 UTC yesterday to 11 UTC today). The sun produced 15 flares over 24 hours, 11 C flares and four M flares.The largest event of the period was the M9.3 flare at 12:51 UTC on June 23 from AR3723. The last two M flares from AR3712 were part of a larger eruption of the western limb. The M9.3 flare caused an R1 (minor) radio blackout over the eastern Atlantic Ocean and western Africa. The other three M flares caused R1 radio blackouts where the sun was highest in the sky.
This list of M flares is:
– June 23 11:26 M1.3 AR3712, R1 radio blackout over the E. Atlantic Ocean and W. Africa
– June 23 12:51 M9.3 AR3723, R3 radio blackout over the E. Atlantic Ocean and W. Africa
– June 24 04:08 M1.3 AR3712, R1 radio blackout over Asia
– June 24 04:45 M1.9 AR3712, R1 radio blackout over Asia
Regions AR3712, AR3713, and AR3719 have beta-gamma magnetic complexity, and AR3725 has beta-delta complexity. There are three new regions: AR3724, AR3725, and AR3726. The sun has 10 active regions on the Earth-facing disk.
Next 24 hours: The chance for C flares is 99%. The chance for M flares is 60%. The chance for X flares is 15% today.
Next expected CME: No Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were observed in available coronagraph imagery during the past day.
Current geomagnetic activity: Earth’s magnetic field is quiet at the time of this writing (11 UTC on June 24). The geomagnetic field activity is expected to reach quiet to unsettled levels today, June 24, due to high-speed solar wind from a coronal hole. Quiet conditions are expected to prevail on June 25–26.

The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with a mottled surface.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Mario Rana in Hampton, Virginia, captured this filtered image on June 23, 2024. Mario wrote: “Hydrogen-alpha image of the sun with numerous active regions. Some nice filaments and prominences too.” Thank you, Mario!
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity – with the most active regions labeled – as of 0 UTC on June 24, 2024. Original image, without labels, via NASA SDO. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky. Today’s sun is posted by Armando Caussade. Why are east and west on the sun reversed?

Sun news for June 23, 2024: Is energetic region AR3697 back?

Could energetic sunspot region AR3697 be back? Around 3:18 UTC on June 23, a filament erupted off the sun’s southeastern limb, the side just now rotating into view. Thanks to helioseismology, we know this filament eruption might be associated with a known sunspot region. It could be sunspot region AR3697, formerly AR3664, now perhaps making its 3rd trip across the sun’s visible face (after being carried out of view twice by the sun’s rotation). This sunspot region produced some of the strongest activity of Solar Cycle 25 so far. It was a major driver of the May, 2024, superstorm. Stay tuned to see if this region brings us more excitement in its new incarnation.
Last 24 hours: Isolated M flares, one at the beginning of our observation period (11 UTC yesterday to 11 UTC today) and one near the end, kept sun activity levels at moderate. We saw 19 flares in all over the past day. We also saw an eruption off the sun’s northwest this morning, at 6:18 UTC, as an expansion of a coronal loop. The first M flare (in the east from AR3720) was an M1.0 flare at 11:00 UTC on June 22. It caused an R1 (minor) radio blackout over Africa. The second M of the day, the largest of the period, was an M2.4 flare blasted out by active region AR3716 at 6:16 UTC on June 23. It caused an R1 (minor) radio blackout over Asia. AR3712 and AR3720 were the lead flare producers during the observation period. Sunspot region AR3713 kept its delta magnetic complexity, while AR3712 and AR3716 now show a beta-gamma configuration. These three flares have flare potential. As they get closer to the west limb (edge), any solar energetic particles resulting from those flares might travel a special avenue toward Earth, known as the Parker Spiral. The sun has seven active regions on the Earth-facing disk.

Two square videos, first part is the bottom left of a red, gold, sphere and the second part is the upper right of a red, gold sphere.
Sun news for June 22-23, 2024. Two eruptions from the sun observed in 304 and 171 angstrom wavelengths for SDO. One from the sun’s southeast, and the second from the northwest. Images via SDO and JHelioviewer.

The sun in recent days

The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 5 UTC on June 23, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 2 UTC on June 22, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 0 UTC on June 21, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 0 UTC on June 20, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 0 UTC on June 19, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 0 UTC on June 18, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 4 UTC on June 17, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.

Sun images from our community

Are you a fan of sun images? We invite you all to send us your beautiful recent photos of sunspots and auroras. We love receiving them and sharing them! And to those of you who’ve already posted a photo to our community page, thank you.

The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with a mottled surface.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Mario Rana in Hampton, Virginia, captured this filtered image on June 23, 2024. Mario wrote: “Hydrogen-alpha image of the sun with numerous active regions. Some nice filaments and prominences too.” Thank you, Mario!
The sun, seen as a large yellowish sphere with small dark spots.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Steve Wilson in Salina, Kansas, captured this filtered image of the sun on June 21, 2024. Steve wrote: “Saw a lot of sunspots and a few clusters so I decided to get my camera out and start taking some photos. ISO 800. 1/1250 second with my 560 mm telescope with a 2x Barlow making it 1120 mm and a white light solar filter.” Thank you, Steve!
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | David Hoskin in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, captured this image of the sun on June 20, 2024. David wrote: “Filtered white light image of the sun showing 3 large and active sunspot groups (top to bottom – AR3716, AR3713, AR3712). All 3 have the potential to unleash solar flares; M-class for AR3716 and AR3713, X-class for AR3712.” Thank you, David!
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with multiple dark spots.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Valerie Liard in Epernay, France, captured this filtered image of the sun on June 19, 2024. Valerie wrote: “Photo taken on the same day as the previous one at a 1-hour interval. The sun is setting with its 3 huge sunspots and 1 magnificent plane passage.” Thank you, Valerie!
The sun, seen as a large white sphere with small dark spots.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Patricio León in Santiago, Chile, captured this filtered image of the sun on June 19, 2024. Patricio wrote: “Awesome sun with two huge sunspot groups. AR3712 is well capable of completing the far-side rotation and reappearing as AR3664 did recently. Two groups of small cores are entering stage at 9 o’clock limb.” Thank you, Patricio!
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with multiple dark spots.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Teresa Molinaro in Palermo, Sicily, Italy, captured this filtered image of the sun on June 19, 2024. Teresa wrote: “The sun this morning at dawn showed some sunspots, clearly visible even to the filtered, unaided eye, since the strong presence of Saharan sand on the Sicilian sky acted as a shield from the light.” Thank you, Teresa!

Submit photos here

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Bottom line: Sun news for June 24, 2024. Former sunspot region AR3697 is back as AR3723, producing an almost-X M9.3 flare off the western limb (edge).

Posted 
June 24, 2024
 in 
Sun

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