Is Zubeneschamali a green star?

Professional astronomers can explain to you why stars can’t look green. Yet many stargazers insist that Zubeneschamali proves otherwise.

Zubenelgenubi is Libra’s alpha star

Zubenelgenubi - Alpha Librae - is a double star, and is the second brightest star in the constellation Libra the Scales.

Ruby red Antares is the Scorpion’s Heart

Red Antares, Heart of the Scorpion in the constellation Scorpius, is a mighty star, a red supergiant in the last stages of its life span.

Alphecca, a jewel in the Northern Crown

Alphecca. Gemma. Alpha Coronae Borealis or simply Alpha Cor Bor. They're all names for a single star, the brightest star in the Northern Crown.

Polaris is the North Star

Many people think Polaris is the brightest star, but it's only 50th in brightness. Still, Polaris is famous because the entire northern sky wheels around it.

Arcturus, brightest star of the north

Arcturus is the brightest star north of the celestial equator. Near the handle of the Big Dipper, it's easy to find in spring in the Northern Hemisphere.

Meet Regulus, the Lion’s Heart

The bright star Regulus in Leo the Lion is prominent in the evening sky in May. It looks like a single point of light, but is really 4 stars.

Cor Caroli, named for the heart of a king

Cor Caroli is a binary star and the brightest star in the northern constellation Canes Venatici, the Hunting Dogs. Its name means Heart of Charles.

Mimosa, 2nd-brightest star in Crux

To see Mimosa, you need to be in the Southern Hemisphere, where it is a prominent star, or at the latitude of New Orleans, Hawaii, Cairo or New Delhi.

Mizar and Alcor in the bend of the Big Dipper

Mizar and Alcor are a famous pair of stars located at the bend of the handle of the Big Dipper. Can you see both without using binoculars?