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Video: What is a pulsar?

A pulsar is a rapidly spinning neutron star which is the small, incredibly dense remnant of much more massive star. How dense? A teaspoon of matter from a neutron star weighs as much as Mount Everest.

Malibu stargazer

View larger. | Shreenivasan Manievannan calls this photo Malibu Stargazer.

View larger. | Shreenivasan Manievannan calls this photo Malibu Stargazer.

Our friend Shreenivasan Manievannan posted this photo to EarthSky Facebook. He wrote that, from this beach in southern California, even with all the light pollution from nearby Los Angeles, the Milky Way rose and was visible to the unaided eye. Thank you, Shreenivasan!

Moon north of Winter Triangle on March 27

If you're at mid-latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere, turn this chart upside-down!

If you’re at mid-latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere, turn this chart upside-down!

Yesterday, on March 26, we featured the Winter Circle, that great big lasso of brilliant stars that even dwarfs the constellation Orion the Giant Hunter. Orion makes up the southwestern part of the Winter Circle, whereas the Winter Triangle fills up the southeastern part of the humongous Winter Circle.

Super salamander nearly ate our ancestors

Toilet jaws: the scourge of people and dinosaurs 200m years ago. Imge credit: University of Edinburgh

Toilet jaws: the scourge of people and dinosaurs 200m years ago. Image credit: University of Edinburgh

Metoposaurus algarvensis, aka toilet jaws, was all over our early ancestors. The thing that got us off the hook? A big hot interception 200 million years ago.

First one-year ISS crew to launch Friday

Photo credit: NASA

Photo credit: NASA

The goal of the mission is to find out how the human body responds to a prolonged stay in space. Watch the launch and watch the arrival.

Mars rover finishes first-ever marathon on another world

This illustration depicts some highlights along the route as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove as far as a marathon race during the first 11 years and two months after its January 2004 landing in Eagle Crater. The vehicle surpassed marathon distance of 26.219 miles (42.195 kilometers) with a drive completed on March 24, 2015, during the 3,968th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars. For this map, north is on the left. View larger | Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./USGS/Arizona State University

This illustration depicts some highlights along the route as NASA’s Mars rover Opportunity. It has now driven as many miles as a marathon race – a first for any Earth vehicle on another world. For this map, north is on the left. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./USGS/Arizona State University

On Tuesday, NASA’s Opportunity Mars Rover completed the first Red Planet marathon – 26.2 miles (42.195 kilometers) – with a finish time of 11 years and 2 months.

Total solar eclipse at 35,000 feet

March 20, 2015 total solar eclipse, seen from an airplane - 35,000 feet up - and captured by Eric Recurt of the UK.

March 20, 2015 total solar eclipse, seen from an airplane – 35,000 feet up – and captured by Eric Recurt of the UK.

Eric wrote:

Day of the eclipse, photo taken from cockpit at cruise level at 35,000 feet out of Bristol.

Looks like a shoot taken from much higher at space height!

Moon and Winter Circle on March 26

2015-march-26-winter-circle-winter-triangle-orion's-belt-night-sky-chart

Tonight’s wide waxing crescent moon resides inside the Winter Circle – an incredibly large star configuration made of six brilliant stars – as seen from North America. We’ll see the Winter Circle fill up much of the south to southwest sky at dusk/nightfall. Elsewhere in the world, the moon will also be in the midst of these stars, or at least near them.

‘Seeds of Time’ to hit theaters in May

View larger. | The Svalbard Global Seed Vault officially opened on February 26, 2008.  The roof and vault entrance are filled with highly reflective stainless steel, mirrors, and prisms, designed to reflect polar light in the summer months, making the seed vault visible from a distance.  Image via Norway's Ministry of Agriculture and Food

The Svalbard Global Seed Vault officially opened in 2008. Its roof and vault entrance are filled with highly reflective stainless steel, mirrors, and prisms, designed to reflect polar light in the summer months, making the seed vault visible from a distance. In winter, there is a special lighting system. There is no permanent staff on site. Image via Norway’s Ministry of Agriculture and Food

Have you heard of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault – sometimes called the Doomsday Vault – a seed bank on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen, only 810 miles (about 1,300 kilometers) from the North Pole? Cary Fowler spearheaded its groundbreaking in 2006, and he remains the seed bank’s prime mover. Now a new film – due to open on May 22 – tracks the passion for saving a global diversity of seeds that has occupied Fowler for three decades.

Sunsets are moving north

Photos taken in March 2015 by Abhijit Juvekar in Dombai, India.

Photos taken in March 2015 by Abhijit Juvekar in Dombivli, India, part of the Mumbai metropolitan region.

Abhijit Juvekar posted this photo to EarthSky Facebook yesterday (March 24, 2015), in an illustration of the fact that – at this time of year, as seen from across the globe – the sunsets are moving a little farther northward each evening.