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Star of the week: Deneb Kaitos

Look for Deneb Kaitos – brightest star in Cetus the Whale – highest in the sky around mid-evening.

Schedar lies at the Queen’s heart

Cassiopeia the Queen is one of the easiest-to-recognize constellations, having the shape of an M or W, Schedar is the Queen’s brightest star.

Alpheratz is part of the Great Square

Finding the star Alpheratz can help you spot the Andromeda Galaxy, the nearest large spiral galaxy to Earth.

Gamma Cephei: A future Pole Star

Gamma Cephei will someday be a Pole Star for Earth.

Fomalhaut had first visible exoplanet

How to see the star Fomalhaut in your sky and a word about Fomalhaut b, the first planet beyond our solar system visible to the eye in photographic images.

Delta Cephei is a famous variable star

Delta Cephei doubles in brightness every 5.36 days and thereby helped establish the known distance scale of our galaxy and universe.

Alpha Cephei is a rapidly rotating star

While not one of the most conspicuous stars in the night sky, Alderamin – aka Alpha Cephei – is easy to spot, and is interesting for its rapid rotation on its axis.

Deneb is distant and very luminous

Deneb is one of the most distant stars you will see with your eye alone. That’s because it’s one of the most luminous stars in the Milky Way galaxy.

Altair is the bright star of the Eagle

Altair needs only 10 hours to spin once on its axis, in contrast to roughly a month for our sun. This mighty star spins on its axis faster than Earth does!

Albireo, beloved double star

Albireo is known best for the striking color contrast between its two stars – the brighter gold star and the dimmer blue star.

Epsilon Lyrae is the famous Double Double star

Binoculars reveal that Epsilon Lyrae is a double star – two stars in one. A telescope shows that each component star is also a double. The double double star!

Vega is the Harp Star

One of the prettiest stories in all skylore surrounds this star. “On the 7th night of the 7th moon … “

Eltanin and Rastaban, the Dragon’s Eyes

These two famous stars shine down from the northern sky. Eltanin and Rastaban represent the fiery Eyes of the constellation Draco the Dragon.

Scorpion stinger stars Shaula and Lesath

Shaula and Lesath are noticeably bright and close together.  They lie at the end of Scorpius the Scorpion’s graceful curved tail.

Antares is Heart of the Scorpion

Bright red Antares is easy to spot now. It’s the brightest star in the constellation Scorpius and represents the Scorpion’s Heart.

Alphecca, the jewel in the Northern Crown

Alphecca. Gemma. Alpha Coronae Borealis or simply Alpha Cor Bor. They’re all names for one star – the brightest star in the constellation Northern Crown.

The Guardians of the Pole

Kochab and Pherkad – 2 stars in the Little Dipper – are called Guardians of the Pole. How to find them and more.

Is Zubeneschamali green?

Although some scientists claim stars can’t look green, many stargazers will swear that Zubeneschamali proves otherwise.

Zubenelgenubi is Libra’s alpha star

It’s now Libra’s alpha star. But Zubenelgenubi is an Arabic name indicating that this star was once perceived as the Southern Claw of Scorpius the Scorpion.

Polaris is the North Star

The entire northern sky wheels around Polaris. But it’s not the brightest star in the sky. In fact, Polaris ranks only 50th in brightness.