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| Astronomy Essentials | Space on Oct 26, 2014

Dates of lunar and solar eclipses in 2015 and 2016

Upcoming eclipses.

The large gray circle shows the path of the partial solar eclipse whereas the small black dot depicts the path of the total solar eclipse on March 20, 2015.

The large gray circle shows the path of the partial solar eclipse whereas the small black dot depicts the path of the total solar eclipse on March 20, 2015.

The next eclipse is a total eclipse of the sun on March 20, 2015, which falls on the same date as the March 2015 equinox. Although you have to be at the just right spot on Earth to witness this total eclipse of the sun, a much larger swath of the world (Greenland, Iceland, Europe, northern Africa, the Middle East and northwestern Asia) will get to see varying degrees of a partial solar eclipse . Follow the links below to learn the dates for upcoming solar and lunar eclipses in 2015 and 2016. Enjoy.

Supermoon to stage total eclipse of the sun on March 20

Eclipses in 2015

Eclipses in 2016

Fortnight (approximate two-week) separation between solar and lunar eclipses

Composite total solar eclipse Aug. 1999 by Fred Espenak.

Composite total solar eclipse Aug. 1999 by Fred Espenak.

This is what a total eclipse looks like.  This is the total eclipse of October 27, 2004 via Fred Espenak of NASA, otherwise known as Mr. Eclipse.  Visit Fred's page here.

This is what a total eclipse looks like. This is the total eclipse of October 27, 2004 via Fred Espenak of NASA. Visit Fred’s page here. We astronomy writers often describe a totally eclipsed moon as appearing ‘blood red.’ Here’s why the moon turns red during a total eclipse.

Eclipses in 2015
March 20: Total solar eclipse
April 4: Total lunar eclipse
September 13: Partial solar eclipse
September 28: Total lunar eclipse

Eclipses in 2016
March 9: Total solar eclipse
March 23: Penumbral lunar eclipse
September 1: Annular solar eclipse
September 16: penumbral lunar eclipse

Fortnight (approximate two-week) separation between solar and lunar eclipses. A solar eclipse always takes place within one fortnight of any lunar eclipse. For instance, in 2015, the total solar eclipse on March 20 comes one fortnight before the Blood Moon total lunar eclipse of April 4. The partial solar eclipse on September 13 occurs one fortnight before the Blood Moon total lunar eclipse of September 28. In 2016, the total solar eclipse of March 9 happens one fortnight before the penumbral lunar eclipse of March 23; and the September 1 annular solar eclipse takes place one fortnight before the September 16 penumbral lunar eclipse.

Somewhat rarely, a solar eclipse can occur one fortnight before and after a lunar eclipse. This will next happen in the year 2018:
July 13: Partial solar eclipse
July 27: Total lunar eclipse
August 11: Partial solar eclipse

Somewhat rarely, a lunar eclipse can come one fortnight before and after a solar eclipse. This will next happen in the year 2020:
June 5: Penumbral lunar eclipse
June 21: Annular solar eclipse
July 5: Penumbral lunar eclipse

Read more about three eclipses in one month

Animation of the October 8, 2014, total lunar eclipse, whereby the moon passes through the Earth's shadow from west to east. The horizontal yellow line depicts the ecliptic. The nearby dim

Animation of the October 8, 2014, total lunar eclipse, when the moon passes through the Earth’s shadow from west to east. The horizontal yellow line depicts the ecliptic. The nearby dim “star” is actually the planet Uranus, which may be visible through binoculars. Image via Tomruen

Bottom line: Dates of solar and lunar eclipses in 2015 and 2016.

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