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| Astronomy Essentials | Space on Oct 23, 2014

Is it possible to have three eclipses in one month?

Three eclipses in one calendar month are rare. Three eclipses in one lunar month are more common. From 2000-2050, it happens 14 times.

Is it possible to have three eclipses in one month? Yes, it’s possible. You can have two solar eclipses with one lunar eclipse in between in the span of one month. In a one-month period, you can also have two lunar eclipses with a solar eclipse in between. However, if we’re talking about a calendar month – as opposed to a lunar month – it’s quite rare to have three eclipses. Follow the links below to learn more about past and future months in which there are three eclipses, and about upcoming eclipses.

Three eclipses in one calendar month

Three eclipses in one lunar month

Total eclipse of Blood Moon on night of October 7-8

North Americans see partial solar eclipse on October 23

Partial solar eclipse photo by Fred Espenak

Partial solar eclipse photo by Fred Espenak

Three eclipses in one calendar month. According to NASA eclipse expert Fred Espenak, three eclipses fall in the same calendar month only 12 times during the five-century span from 1801-2300. Six times there are two solar eclipses and one lunar eclipse in one calendar month. Six times there are two penumbral lunar eclipses and a total (or annular) solar eclipse in one calendar month.

The last time we had three eclipses in a calendar month was in July 2000, when two partial solar eclipses bracketed a total lunar eclipse:

2000 July 01: Partial solar eclipse
2000 July 16: Total lunar eclipse
2000 July 31: Partial solar eclipse

Previous to July 2000, the last time three eclipses took place in one calendar month was in March 1904, when two penumbral lunar eclipses bracketed an annular solar eclipse.

1904 March 02: Penumbral lunar eclipse
1904 March 17: Annular solar eclipse
1904 March 31: Penumbral lunar eclipse

After July 2000, three eclipses will next occur within one calendar month in December 2206:

2206 Dec 01: Partial solar eclipse
2206 Dec 16: Total lunar eclipse
2206 Dec 30: Partial solar eclipse

Total lunar eclipse in 2004 by Fred Espenak

Total lunar eclipse photo by Fred Espenak

Three eclipses in one lunar month. Some might argue that the calendar month is an artificial constraint. It might be more appropriate to use a lunar (or synodic) month, which is a natural unit of time. A lunar month refers to time period between successive new moons, or successive full moons.

Although it is rare for three eclipses to happen in the same calendar month, it’s not that uncommon for three eclipses to occur in one lunar month. In fact, from the years 2000-2050, the three-eclipses-in-one-month phenomenon takes place a total of fourteen times. Six times, the lunar month features two solar eclipses and one lunar eclipse (2000, 2011, 2018, 2029, 2036 & 2047). Eight times, the lunar month presents two lunar eclipses and one solar eclipse (2002, 2009, 2013, 2020, 2027, 2031, 2038 & 2049).

Lunar month of 3 eclipses means 7 eclipses in one year’s time

Three eclipses last took place in one lunar month in the year 2013:

2013 April 25: Partial lunar eclipse
2013 May 10: Annular solar eclipse
2013 May 25: Penumbral lunar eclipse

Previous to 2013, three eclipses last took place in one lunar month in 2011:

2011 June 01: Partial solar eclipse
2011 June 15: Total lunar eclipse
2011 July 01: Partial solar eclipse

After 2013, three eclipses in one lunar month will next occur in 2018:

2018 July 13: Partial solar eclipse
2018 July 27: Total lunar eclipse
2018 Aug 11: Partial solar eclipse

Sources:
Catalog of lunar eclipses 2001-2100

Catalog of solar eclipses 2001-2100

Bottom line: It’s possible to have three eclipses within the time frame of a month. It’s rare to have three eclipses within a calendar month, but three eclipses within a lunar month is more common.

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