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Sun news May 28, 2024: X2.9 flare yesterday

May 27, 2024. The sun produced an X2.9 flare at 7:08 UTC on May 27. An incoming active region on the southeast limb (edge) – still behind the solar horizon – was the flare’s source. Could it be AR3664, returning? Image via SDO.

Sun news for May 28, 2024: X2.9 flare yesterday

Today’s top story: And we’re back, after two days off for the Memorial Day weekend. While we were out, the sun blasted an X2.9 flare at 7:08 UTC on May 27. It came from an incoming active region on the sun’s southeast limb (edge). Presumably, the producer is the former large sunspot region AR3664, still located  behind the solar horizon. In the two days before this X flare, the sun was quiet, with not even a single M flare (moderately sized flare). There were only little C flares. Then early yesterday, boom! This unexpected X flare. Since then, it’s been quiet again. The X flare provoked an R3 (strong) radio blackout, affecting an area over the Arabian Sea. And it produced a huge prominence, with a large partial halo registered by SOHO’s LASCO C2 and C3. The coronal mass ejection (CME) produced during the event is not coming our way at Earth. But a bit of its shock wave could sideswipe Earth today. Keep tuned for more sun news.
Last 24 hours: Note that the X flare happened just outside our ordinary observation period (11 UTC yesterday to 11 UTC). Thus, over the past day, solar activity was considered low. But the sun produced a lot of little flares, 17 C flares in all. The largest was a C9 at 19:16 UTC on May 27 from the incoming active region on the sun’s southeast, presumably the former AR3664. This active region, unnumbered as yet, has been quite productive. It blasted out 13 C flares out of the day’s 17 flares. Meanwhile, its former companion – formerly labeled AR3663, now AR3691 – has been quiet, producing only a few C flares during the weekend. But AR3691 is still is the largest active region in physical size on the Earth-facing solar disk. Currently, the sun has eight labeled active regions on its Earth-facing side.
Next 24 hours: The chance for C flares is 99%. The chance for M flares is 60%. The chance for X flares increased from  10% up to 30% today after yesterday’s X2.9 flare and the imminent entrance of the active region on the sun’s southeast limb (edge).
Next expected CME: Yesterday’s X2.9 flare produced a fast partial halo event registered by SOHO’s LASCO C2 at 7:12 UTC on May 27. A strong prominence was observed. Nevertheless, due to its position on the sun, the large coronal mass ejection (CME) produced during the X flare is not Earthbound. However, due to its strength, a shock influence at Earth may happen today. No other CMEs were observed over the past day on available coronagraph imagery.
Current geomagnetic activity: Earth’s magnetic field is quiet at the time of this writing (11 UTC on May 28). Quiet-to-unsettled conditions are anticipated on May 29 due to the influence of fast solar wind from a coronal hole. A G1 (minor) geomagnetic storm can be considered due to a shock influence with the possible arrival of a component of the CME hurled by the sun on May 27.

May 27, 2024. SOHO’s LASCO C2 and C3 registered the X2.9 flare event. It produced a huge prominence and a large partial halo event. The coronal mass ejection (CME) produced during the event is not Earth-bound. Image via NOAA.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity – with the most active regions labeled – as of 2 UTC on May 28, 2024. Original image, without labels, via NASA SDO. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky. Today’s sun is posted by Armando Caussade. Why are east and west on the sun reversed?

The sun in recent days

The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 0 UTC on May 27, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 0 UTC on May 26, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 3 UTC on May 25, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 0 UTC on May 24, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 1 UTC on May 23, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 0 UTC on May 22, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with dark spots, each labeled.
This image shows sun activity, with the most active regions labeled, as of 2 UTC on May 21, 2024. Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams, with labeling by EarthSky.

Sun images from our community

Are you a fan of sun images? We invite you all to send us your beautiful recent photos of sunspots and auroras. We love receiving them and sharing them! And to those of you who’ve already posted a photo to our community page, thank you.

A sun close-up, seen as a dark sectional sphere with a bright yellow flares
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Egidio Vergani in Milano, Italy, captured this hydrogen-alpha filtered image of the sun on May 26, 2024. Egidio wrote: “Large solar flares on May 26, 2024.” Thank you, Egidio!
The sun, seen as a large white sphere with small dark spots.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Patricio León in Santiago, Chile, captured this filtered image of the sun on May 26, 2024. Patricio wrote: “AR3691 at upper left has more than doubled its size in the last 24 hours.” Thank you, Patricio!
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with a mottled surface.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Jim Militello in Tucson, Arizona, captured this hydrogen-alpha filtered image of the sun on May 26, 2024. Jim wrote: “This image of the sun is showing active regions 3685 and 3691 with sunspots.” Thank you, Jim!
The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with a mottled surface.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Mario Rana in Hampton, Virginia, captured this filtered image on May 26, 2024. Mario wrote: “Hydrogen-alpha image of the sun featuring large active region AR3691 near the northeast limb.” Thank you, Mario!

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View community photos here

Bottom line: Sun news for May 28, 2024. We had an X2.9 flare early yesterday from an incoming active region on the sun’s southeast limb.

Posted 
May 28, 2024
 in 
Brightest Stars

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