Dates of solar and lunar eclipses in 2019

Dates of all solar and lunar eclipses this year. Is there one you can see?

Various stages of an annular solar eclipse from Brocken Inaglory via Wikimedia Commons.

Various stages of an annular solar eclipse from Brocken Inaglory via Wikimedia Commons.

Eclipses in 2019
January 6, 2019: Partial solar eclipse
January 21, 2019: Total lunar eclipse

July 2, 2019: Total solar eclipse
July 16, 2019: Partial lunar eclipse

December 26, 2019: Annular solar eclipse
January 10, 2020: Penumbral lunar eclipse

On a worldwide scale, a solar eclipse always comes within one fortnight (approximately two weeks) of lunar eclipse.

The first solar eclipse of 2019 happens during the daylight hours on January 5 or 6 – depending on your location – when the new moon takes a bite out of the solar disk. It’s a partial eclipse, not a total one. This partial eclipse of the sun is primarily visible from northeastern Asia and the northern part of the North Pacific Ocean, including Alaska’s Aleutian Islands.

One fortnight (approximately two weeks) after the January 5-6 solar eclipse, the full supermoon will pass through the Earth’s dark shadow on the night of January 20-21, 2019. It’ll stage the last total lunar eclipse until May 26, 2021. This total lunar eclipse will be visible from North and South America, plus much of Europe and Africa.

One semester (six lunar months or six new moons) after the January 5-6, 2019, partial solar eclipse, a total eclipse of the sun will take place on July 2, 2019. Then the partial lunar eclipse on July 16, 2019, will happen one semester (six lunar months or six full moons) after the January 20-21 total lunar eclipse.

Fortnight (approximate two-week) separation between solar and lunar eclipses. A solar eclipse always takes place within one fortnight of any lunar eclipse. This year, we have a pair of eclipses (one solar and one lunar) in January and then in July 2019. We also have an annular solar eclipse on December 26, 2019, followed by the penumbral lunar eclipse of January 10, 2020. Although this pair of eclipses (one solar and one lunar) straddles different years, these eclipses are still one fortnight apart:

December 26, 2019: Annular solar eclipse
January 10, 2020: Penumbral lunar eclipse

Somewhat rarely, a solar eclipse can occur one fortnight before and after a lunar eclipse. This most recently happened last year, in 2018:

July 13: Partial solar eclipse
July 27: Total lunar eclipse
August 11: Partial solar eclipse

Somewhat rarely, a lunar eclipse can come one fortnight before and after a solar eclipse. This will happen next year, in 2020:

June 5: Penumbral lunar eclipse
June 21: Annular solar eclipse
July 5: Penumbral lunar eclipse

Read more about three eclipses in one month

This is what a total eclipse looks like - a reddish, dark orange moon.

This is what a total lunar eclipse looks like. It’s the total lunar eclipse of October 27, 2004, via Fred Espenak of NASA. Visit Fred’s page here. We astronomy writers often describe a totally eclipsed moon as appearing ‘blood red.’ Here’s why the moon turns red during a total eclipse.

picture of eclipse, dark circle with white light flaring out around it.

Composite image of a 1999 total solar eclipse by Fred Espenak. Read his article on the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse, first one visible from contiguous North America since 1979.

Bottom line: Dates of solar and lunar eclipses in 2019.

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Bruce McClure

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