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Where exactly is the moon? Eclipse stories from Indonesia

The Tadulako University/Western Kentucky University team in Palu, Indonesia.

The Tadulako University/Western Kentucky University team in Palu, Indonesia.

The solar eclipse of March 9 brought together students from around the world – and EarthSky helped to make it happen.

Ocean temps predict heat waves 50 days out

The heat wave predicted by the ocean temp pattern - called the __ - above. June 29, 2012, was the hottest day of the year in the eastern United States.

June 29 was the hottest day of 2012 in the eastern United States. Scientists found that the extreme heat around that time could have been predicted by a pattern of ocean water temperatures – which they call the Pacific Extreme Pattern – shown in an image inside this post. Image via NCAR/UCAR/McKinnon.

Scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) said on March 28, 2016, that it’s possible to use an ocean pattern – warmer-than-average water butting up against cooler-than-average water – in the North Pacific Ocean to predict an increased chance of summertime heat waves in the U.S. 50 days in advance.

Why does the moon seem to follow you?

Full moon photo by EarthSky community member Fernando Alvarenga in San Salvador.

Full moon photo by EarthSky community member Fernando Alvarenga in San Salvador.

You, or your kids, might notice this. When you’re moving in a car, earthly objects get left behind, but the moon seems to follow. Why?

Another asteroid clobbers Jupiter

Cropped still from a video by Gerrit Kernbauer of Austria. He acquired it on March 17, 2016.

Cropped still from a video by Gerrit Kernbauer of Austria.

Two amateur astronomers apparently caught a flash on Jupiter on March 17, 2016, a possible indication of an asteroid impact into the giant planet’s upper atmosphere.

This date in science: Comet Hale-Bopp

Comet Hale-Bopp with its prominent dust (white) and plasma (blue) tails. Photo via E. Kolmhofer, H. Raab; Johannes-Kepler-Observatory, Linz, Austria.

Comet Hale-Bopp with its prominent dust (white) and plasma (blue) tails. Photo via E. Kolmhofer, H. Raab; Johannes-Kepler-Observatory, Linz, Austria.

April 1, 1997. On this date, Comet Hale-Bopp – probably the best-remembered bright comet for many in the Northern Hemisphere – reached its perihelion or closest point to the sun.

The extremely hot heart of quasar 3C273

Chandra's image of 3C273 shows important new details in the extremely powerful jet that probably originates from gas that is falling toward a supermassive black hole but is then redirected by strong electromagnetic fields. This Chandra image has enabled scientists, for the first time, to detect a continuous X-ray flow in 3C273 from the core (upper left) to the jet. This discovery may reveal insight into the physical processes that power these long-puzzling energetic jets.

Chandra X-Ray Observatory image of quasar 3C273. Its extremely powerful jet probably originates from gas that is falling toward a supermassive black hole.

Scientists combined radio telescopes on Earth and with the Earth-orbiting radio telescope RadioAstro to learn that the famous quasar 3C273 has a core temperature hotter than 10 trillion degrees! That’s much hotter than formerly thought possible.

Evolution insights from a walking cavefish

The blind cavefish, Cryptotora thamicola, walking up a tank wall angled at an approximately 90 degree incline, towards a trickling water flow. Image credit: Brooke E. Flammang et al.

A blind cavefish, Cryptotora thamicola, walking up a tank wall angled at an approximately 90 degree incline, towards a trickling water flow. Image via Brooke E. Flammang et al.

A blind cavefish species in Thailand has evolved a unique ability to walk and climb like a salamander. It’s the kind of adaptation that might have occurred about 420 million years ago, when fish fins evolved into limbs suited for moving on land.

Watch giant ice bridge collapse

An ice bridge collapsed at Perito Moreno Glacier in Argentina earlier this month. Hundreds of tourists and locals gathered to witness the dramatic event.

How do flocking birds move in unison?

Guy Livesay caught these Red-winged Blackbirds, over Mattamuskeet Lake in North Carolina in 2012. Thank you Guy!

We’ve all seen flocks of birds wheeling and swooping in unison, as if choreographed. How do they do this? Zoologists say they aren’t simply following a leader, or their neighbors. If they were, the reaction time of each bird would need to be exceedingly fast – faster than birds actually react, according to scientists …

Another record low for Arctic sea ice

View larger. | Arctic sea ice was at a record low wintertime maximum extent for the second straight year. At 5.607 million square miles, it is the lowest maximum extent in the satellite record, and 431,000 square miles below the 1981 to 2010 average maximum extent. Image via NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio/C. Starr.

Arctic sea ice was at a record low wintertime maximum extent for the second straight year. Image via NASA Goddard’s Scientific Visualization Studio/C. Starr.

In 2016, Arctic sea ice reached its lowest wintertime maximum extent in the 37-year satellite record. It’s slightly lower than the previous record, set last year. This year’s wintertime sea ice in the Arctic peaked on March 24 at 5.6 million square miles (14.52 million square km).