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Videos

Why don’t planets twinkle like stars do?

If you could see stars and planets from outer space, both would shine steadily. But – from Earth – stars twinkle while planets shine steadily. Why?

If you could ride a rocket to space, here’s what you’d see

Here’s a unique perspective, from cameras mounted on the upper stage of the Soyuz rocket that sent Europe’s Sentinel-1A satellite into space last week.

Video: April 1 tsunami moving across Pacific

This is a near real-time animation by NOAA NWS Pacific Tsunami Warning Center for the tsunami from northern Chile resulting from yesterday’s offshore 8.2 magnitude earthquake in the region. Watch the elapsed time in the upper left corner.

Mars opposition happens this month: It’s really easy to see

Earth and Mars are converging for a beautiful close encounter in April, an event astronomers call “the opposition of Mars.”

Aurora alert for April 1 and 2

If you live at a high latitude, be alert for a good display of auroras, or northern lights, beginning late tonight (April 1, 2014) and into tomorrow night. NOAA forecasters estimate a 60% chance of polar geomagnetic storms on April 2. Video shows the X-flare that took place on Saturday, March 29. One of the incoming CMEs is from this flare.

Video: Smart crow!

A BBC production shows a crow solving an 8-step puzzle to get food.

Video: Grizzly eats my GoPro

A few years ago, the BBC hired Brad Josephs to guide a film crew for a production called the Great Bear Stakeout. His main assignment was to track a monster male bear they called Van, tracking wolves and hoping to film them with bears, and most importantly, to help set up remote, unmaned cameras to get super up-close wide angle shots that would be impossible to film otherwise. This great video is one result of that experience.

Video: Watch an octopus squeeze though tiny hole

It’s just cool, that’s all. Watch this 40-second video of an octopus squeezing through a tiny hole to escape a box.

Night sky as Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies merge

This illustration shows a stage in the predicted merger between our Milky Way galaxy and the neighboring Andromeda galaxy, as it will unfold over the next several billion years. In this image, representing Earth's night sky in 3.75 billion years, Andromeda (left) fills the field of view and begins to distort the Milky Way with tidal pull.  Via NASA; ESA; Z. Levay and R. van der Marel, STScI; T. Hallas; and A. Mellinger.

This illustration shows a stage in the predicted merger between our Milky Way galaxy and the neighboring Andromeda galaxy, as it will unfold over the next several billion years. Via NASA; ESA; Z. Levay and R. van der Marel, STScI; T. Hallas; and A. Mellinger.

As seen on Cosmos … the collision and merger between our Milky Way galaxy and the nearby Andromeda galaxy 4 billion years from now. This post contains both a video and a series of photo illustrations, showing the predicted merger between our two titan spiral galaxies, as seen in Earth’s sky. Will Earth as a planet survive long enough to see this? A word about that – and what Earth’s sky will look like when the collision takes place – inside.

Video: Big Bang breakthrough explained with a towel and an apple

Two-minute explanation of this week’s announcement about gravitational waves and the Big Bag – using a towel, an apple and a ping pong ball.