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Top 7 EarthSky images of 2017

Here are 7 of your favorite images of the year.

Funnel cloud from Rio: Photos showing a funnel cloud seen around sunset, from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. No tornado, storm or even rain was reported. More.

February 7, 2017 photo by Helio C. Vital in Rio.

Stacked moons: A stack of moon images from the morning of February 24, taken at 1-minute intervals as the moon rose from the horizon, by Ken Christison. More.

Image via Ken Christison

Artificial space clouds over U.S. East: NASA launched a sounding rocket on June 29 that formed colorful clouds in space, visible from New York to North Carolina. More.

Artificial clouds generated by rocket fired from Wallops Island, Virginia on June 29, 2017. Photo via Robert Williams. Read more.

Giant iceberg on the move: The calving of this iceberg in July reduced the size of Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf by 12 percent. More.

Giant iceberg breaking away from Larsen C ice shelf. Image via ESA.

Red sprite over Oklahoma: Photographer Paul Smith said he thinks this may be the 1st documented capture of a red sprite over Oklahoma. They’re large-scale electrical discharges – high above thunderstorm clouds – flickering in the night. More.

Red sprite over Oklahoma, caught by Paul Smith on October 6. Visit Dramatic sky photography by Paul Smith on Facebook.

Land of Terror: This looks like an abstract painting, but it’s a satellite image of the Tanezrouft Basin, a part of the Sahara Desert in central Algeria known as the Land of Terror. More.

This natural-color image, acquired on October 22, 2017, by NASA/s Landsat 8 satellite, shows concentric rings of exposed sandstone strata that create stunning patterns across the Tanezrouft Basin. Viewed from 705 kilometers (438 miles) above Earth. Image via NASA.

California in flames: According to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, the 2017 California wildfire season is the worst on record. More.

This image was acquired via the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite on December 5. Image via NASA Earth Observatory.

… And we’ve had so many more great today’s images in 2017. You can see all of them here.

Bottom line: Favorite EarthSky images of 2017.

Eleanor Imster

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