Don’t miss these sunspot photos

More photos of the magnificent solitary sunspot – AR2738 – that’s made its way across the sun’s face over the past couple of weeks. Thanks to all in the EarthSky community who contributed photos!

Large image of sun, yellow in middle and red around the edges.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Dr Ski in Valencia, Philippines, caught this photo of the sunspot, with prominences also visible, on April 17, 2019. He wrote, “I’m hoping that AR 2738 puts on a nice show when it rotates around to the sun’s western limb in a couple of days!” Thank you, Dr Ski!

Sun with small sunspot labeled with arrow pointing at it.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | John Shaw in Lincoln, Nebraska, captured this sunspot on April 15, 2019. He wrote, “Sunspot AR2738 from my front yard.” Thank you, John.

Black sunspot and its orange halo, tiny Earth beside sun for scale.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Padraic Koen in Adelaide, Australia, caught this closeup of sunspot AR2738 on April 14, 2019. Thank you, Padraic.

Suns side by side with spots, one with jetliner silhouetted on it.

View larger at EarthSky Community Photos. | Two sunspots three years apart as captured by Alexander Krivenyshev in New York. He caught sunspot AR2738 on April 13 and wrote: “Sunspot 2738 is almost in the same location as sunspot 2529 was in the 2016 photo (exactly 3 years ago) I took with the WestJet airplane.” Thank you, Alexander.

Round yellowish-orange sun with small spot visible.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Justin Berke caught sunspot AR2738 from Florida’s Space Coast on April 12, 2019. He wrote, “Captured with a basic DLSR, solar filter, and kit telephoto lens, and I added annotation and Earth for scale.” Thank you, Justin.

Montage: 4 pics of rocket trail in distance, 2 of sun with spot.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Michael Holland Sr. of Lakeland, Florida, made this montage of the liftoff of the Falcon Heavy Lift vehicle with two sunspot photos taken on April 10 and 11, 2019. He wrote, “Captured sunspot AR2738 on April 10 after I photographed the SpaceX Falcon Heavy ARABSAT 6A launch from my house.” Thank you, Michael.

Flattened setting sun, with large sunspot visible.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Eileen Ferguson captured this image of sunspot AR2738 on April 10, 2019. She’s in Mallaig, in the Scottish Highlands. Thank you, Eileen. Early astronomers first glimpsed sunspots at sunrise or sunset. Nowadays, we know you should never look at the sun without eye protection. Many good solar filters for telescopes and cameras are available.

Images of the sun and sunspot, through various filters.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Dr Ski in the Philippines captured this image of the sunspot – which is labeled AR 2738 – on April 12, 2019. He wrote: “AR 2738 is large enough to see with the unaided eye through solar eclipse glasses (if you still have yours from the Great American Eclipse!)”

Full gold-colored sun, with sunspot AR2738 in black with wide red boundary.

Sunspot AR2738 as seen by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on April 10, 2019. View more images from SDO. We saw this image at Spaceweather.com, with the comment: “Sunspot AR2738 is crackling with low-level B-class solar flares.”

Full disk of pale blue sun through blue filter, with sunspot.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Victor C. Rogus captured sunspot AR2738 on the morning of April 10, 2019. Thank you, Victor!

Full sun and sunspot in white light.

View at EarthSky Community Photos.| Sunspot AR2738 – April 9, 2019 – as seen from Lake Havasu City, Arizona, via Ken Gallagher Photography. Thanks, Ken!

Three views of sunspot AR2738, on red sun, on yellow sun, and a closeup of the sunspot on yellow sun.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | We first heard of the new sunspot – AR2738 – from Dr Ski in the Philippines on April 9. He posted this photo and wrote: “Another cool sunspot has come around the sun’s eastern limb (it really is cool; around 2,000 degrees C [3,600 F] cooler than the surrounding surface). Full disk images taken at 26X. Close-up captured at 100X. The whitish areas near the sunspot are called ‘plage’ (from the French for ‘beach’) and are easily visible through a solar filter.” Thank you, Dr Ski.

Bottom line: Photos from the EarthSky Community of sunspot AR2738.

Read more: Latest predictions for the coming solar cycle

Deborah Byrd