See it! Mars meets the Sisters

Red Mars has been exceedingly close – and is still close – to the Pleiades star cluster, aka the Seven Sisters. These EarthSky Community photos show them in the west after sunset, where you can see them for some nights to come.

A red starlike point, Mars, next to a bluish dipper-shaped star cluster, the Pleiades.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Abhijit Patil caught red Mars and the dipper-shaped Pleiades star cluster – aka the Seven Sisters – on April 1, 2019. Thank you, Abhijit!

Mars and the Pleiades in the west after sunset.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Dennis Chabot in Rehoboth, Massachusetts – of POSNE NightSky – caught Mars and the Pleiades on April 1, 2019. Thank you, Dennis!

Red Mars and dipper-shaped Pleiades on either side of the top of a pyramid-shaped tree.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Dr Ski in Valencia, Philippines, caught Mars and the Pleiades on March 30, 2019.

A closeup view of the dipper-shaped Pleiades and red Mars.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Steven Sweet in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada – of Lunar 101-Moon Book – caught Mars and the Pleiades on March 25, 2019. Thank you, Steven.

View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Dr Ski also caught Mars and the Pleiades on March 25, 2019. Notice the Pleiades are shaped like a tiny dipper. And notice Mars is red in color. Now notice the V-shaped cluster of stars above them. In skylore, these stars represent the Pleiades’ half-sisters, called the Hyades. Thanks, Dr Ski!

Bottom line: Photos from the EarthSky Community of Mars and the Pleiades, or Seven Sisters, in late March and early April 2019.

Deborah Byrd