James Cameron returns, after record-breaking dive to deepest ocean

James Cameron has become the first human to reach and return solo from the 6.8-mile-deep (11-kilometer-deep) undersea Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench.

James Cameron’s submersible craft Deepsea Challenger reemerged from its record-breaking dive into the Challenger Deep of the Mariana Trench – the deepest known point in the Earth’s oceans – today at 2 UTC (9 p.m. CST on March 25, 2012). Cameron is a National Geographic explorer and filmmaker. He is the first human being to reach the bottom of the 6.8-mile-deep (11-kilometer-deep) undersea trench, traveling in what some call his “vertical torpedo.”

National Geographic explorer and filmmaker James Cameron completed his record-breaking dive to the bottom of the Challenger Deep in the western Pacific at noon local time (1 UTC) on March 26, 2012. Photograph by Mark Thiessen, National Geographic

The DEEPSEA CHALLENGER sub during a February test off Papua New Guinea. Photograph by Mark Thiessen, National Geographic

Mariana Trench in the western Pacific

The Mariana Trench in the western Pacific is an unsusaully deep feature in the ocean floor. Challenger Deep is a slot-shaped depression within the Mariana Trench. Its bottom is 11.3 km (7 miles) long and 1.6 km (1 mile) wide, with gently sloping sides. Challenger Deep is located at the southern end of the Mariana Trench.

James Cameron has become the first human to reach and return solo from the 6.8-mile-deep (11-kilometer-deep) undersea Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific. He descended solo in his craft Deepsea Challenger. The depth his craft recorded was 10,898 metres (35,755 ft) when he touched down.

Read more at National Geographic

Deborah Byrd

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