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EarthSky // Today's Image Release Date: May 25, 2014

Five awesome photos of meteors

Meteor rates for Friday night’s Camelopardalid shower were low. But, thanks to astronomers’ shower predictions, many were outside that night and captured meteor photos.

Steve Lacy caught this beautiful fireball the night of the Camelopardalid meteor shower.  Thank you, Steve.

Steve Lacy caught this beautiful fireball the night of the Camelopardalid meteor shower. Thank you, Steve.

Cat Connor caught some meteors over Mono Lake in California.

Cat Connor caught some meteors Friday night – the night of the Camelopardalid shower – over Mono Lake in California. The double streak on the left in this shot might be the upper stage of Japan’s Daichi-2 booster venting fuel. Read more about that at Phil Plait’s Bad Astronomer blog.

Navaneeth Unnikrishnan said the Camelopardalids meteor shower wasn't very visible from as southerly a latitude as India.  He said,

Navaneeth Unnikrishnan said the Camelopardalids meteor shower wasn’t very visible from as southerly a latitude as India. He said, “Here’s a single meteor i got from 401 shots.” May or may not be a Camelopardalid. Thank you, Navaneeth!

We heard from many people that they saw fireballs, or very bright meteors.  This one is from Kevin Palmer, who was observing from Green River State Wildlife Area in Illinois.

We heard from many people that they saw fireballs, or very bright meteors, on the night of the Camelopardalid meteor shower. This one is from Kevin Palmer, who was observing from Green River State Wildlife Area in Illinois.

View larger. | Glen Wurden caught this Camelopardalid meteor near Los Alamos, New Mexico.  Thank you, Glen!

View larger. | Glen Wurden caught this meteor on the night of the meteor shower near Los Alamos, New Mexico. He doesn’t think it’s a Camelopardalid, but it is a beautiful meteor. Thank you, Glen!

See more meteor photos taken during Friday night’s Camelopardalid shower and read observers’ reports.

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