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EarthSky // Earth, Human World, Science Wire Release Date: May 27, 2014

April 2014 tied with warmest on record, or second-warmest

Yes, some of us in North America have been shivering this spring. But our local weather is not the whole story.

View larger. | Land and ocean temperature departures in 2014, compared to average in April, via NOAA.

View larger. | Land and ocean temperature departures in 2014, compared to average in April, via NOAA..

Globally, April 2014 was either tied with April 2010 for being the warmest April on record … or it was the second-warmest April on record. That difference is between experts at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and at NASA. Either way, it’s a reminder that our local weather is not the whole story.

According to NOAA, April 2014 was tied with April of 2010 as being the warmest April on record globally for land and ocean surface combined. NOAA also said that – globally – the January 2014 to April 2014 period was the 6th warmest Jan-Apr period on record.

And NOAA provided data about the recent U.S. cold months, saying the United States experienced its coldest start to the year (Jan-Apr) since 1993. For the U.S., the January 2014 to April 2014 period was the 46th coldest Jan-Apr period on record.

View larger. | April 2014 significant climate events according to NOAA.

View larger. | April 2014 significant climate events according to NOAA.

Image via NASA GISS, via Accuweather.

Image via NASA GISS, via Accuweather.

Meanwhile, NASA’s GISS reported that – globally – April 2014 was the second-warmest April on record, considering land and ocean combined, behind April 2010. April 2014 averaged 0.73 degrees C. or 1.31 degrees F. above the 1951-1980 average. That’s in contrast to April 2010, which was was 0.80 degrees C. above the average, NASA said.

Bottom line: Globally, April 2014 was tied with April 2010 for being the warmest April on record, or it was the second-warmest April on record.

Via NASA GISS, via NOAA, via Accuweather.