Shell of a recent supernova

The object G1.9+0.3 is 28,000 light-years from Earth, near the center of our Milky Way. It’s an expanding shell in space, left behind by a recent supernova.

A supernova explosion - the most recent known to have occurred near Earth in our galaxy - ejected stellar debris at high velocities, creating this shell in space. This new image is a composite, where low-energy X-rays are red, intermediate energies are green and higher-energy ones are blue. Also shown are optical data, with appearing stars in white. More about this image here. Image via NASA/CXC/NCSU/K.Borkowski et al.;DSS

A supernova explosion – the most recent known in our galaxy – ejected debris from a star at high velocities, creating this shell in space. This new image is a composite, where low-energy X-rays are red, intermediate energies are green and higher-energy ones are blue. Also shown are optical data, with appearing stars in white. More about this image here. Image via NASA/CXC/NCSU/K.Borkowski et al.;DSS

This is the object called G1.9+0.3 by astronomers. It’s about 28,000 light-years from Earth near the center of our Milky Way galaxy. The object is an expanding shell of gas, left behind by the most recent supernova, in Earth’s time frame, known to have occurred in our galaxy.

If gas and dust had not heavily obscured it, the supernova explosion would have been visible from Earth just over a century ago.

A new observation with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory made this image possible. For astronomers, these Chandra observations – made over the equivalent of 11 days of time – reveal new details about the explosion.

Read more here about this photo, from Chandra

Deborah Byrd

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