See it! Moon sweeps past Venus

Have you been watching Venus and the young moon? Enjoy these photos from the EarthSky community around the world. Thank you to all who shared images!

Wednesday evening, August 15, 2018 … Moon will be between Venus and Jupiter

The moon and Venus over Sabah, North Borneo, on August 14, 2018, by Jenney Disimon.

Henrique Feliciano Silva shared this wonderful image of Venus and the moon – plus the moon’s reflection – from Lisbon, Portugal, on August 13, 2018.

Peter Lowenstein in Mutare, Zimbabwe, caught Venus and the moon on August 13, 2018, above a flowering strelitzia in his garden. Notice that – from his Southern Hemishere location – Venus appeared much higher in the sky than the moon on this date. Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ60 compact camera hand-held close to the ground in sunset and night scene exposure modes.

Helio Vital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, also caught the moon and Venus (upper left) on August 13, 2018. Helio wrote: “Here are some photos I have just taken of the 8.7 percent illuminated crescent moon and Venus 13.6 degrees apart. Currently, the -7 magnitude crescent moon is roughly 12 times brighter than Venus. Photos were taken in Rio around 18:00 (UTC-3h) with a Nikon CoolPix P900 camera in its Moon and Dusk Modes and post-processing was performed with Photoscape to reduce noise.”

Suzanne Murphy caught the very thin crescent moon and Venus from Wisconsin on August 13, 2018.

Dave Baughman captured the moon and Venus after sunset on August 13 from Orange, California. See how bright they are? They’re the 2 brightest objects in the evening sky.

Moon and Venus on August 13, 2018, over Belgrade, Serbia, by Desic Ilija Photography.

View larger. | Here’s the moon at the beginning of its trek past the 4 planets in the evening sky now – on August 13, 2018 – as captured from North Carolina by our friend Ken Christison. Also … notice the meteor in the annual Perseid meteor shower! The planet to the immediate left of the moon in this shot is Venus. On the far left of the photo is Mars. Jupiter is the 3rd brightest planets (above the bright lights on the horizon). Saturn is tougher to see … but it’s there, set against the background of the Milky Way.

Bottom line: Photos of the young moon and Venus in August, 2018.

Eleanor Imster