Eta Aquarid meteor shower radiant point

No matter where you are, expect to see the most Eta Aquarid meteors in a dark sky between midnight and dawn.

The radiant point of the Eta Aquarid meteor shower is near the star Eta in the constellation Aquarius the Water Bearer.

The radiant point of the Eta Aquarid meteor shower is near the star Eta in the constellation Aquarius the Water Bearer.

The Eta Aquarid meteor shower follows so closely behind April’s Lyrid meteor shower that it tends to be overlooked each year. Don’t overlook it! It’s an awesome shower for the Southern Hemisphere with perhaps 40 meteors per hour visible at the peak. The shower is less visible to northern observers, but tropical latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere should have a good view, and even mid-northern latitudes can expect about 10 meteors per hour at the peak – still a good meteor display.

More info on the meteor shower here: everything you need to know

Have to miss the Eta Aquarids? Check our meteor guide for showers later this year.

Deborah Byrd