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Milky Way spins across the sky

This composite – centered on celestial south – is made of images taken hourly from outside the dome of the Anglo-Australian Telescope at Siding Spring Observatory.

View larger. | Composite image by Christian Sasse.

Christian Sasse emailed EarthSky on April 11, 2018, from Australia’s Siding Spring Observatory and wrote:

A spectacular night at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (3.9-meter [13-foot] mirror). This composite – made of images taken every hour from 7 p.m. until midnight – shows the apparent movement of the Milky Way across the sky. See Jupiter on the left, leaving a discrete trail as it moves towards the dome until midnight. Top is location of the celestial South Pole.

As you can see, Christian has a novel approach to acquiring photographic images of star trails. His images have been featured in National Geographic and Nature. His Ph.D. in optics has helped shape his photography. You can visit him on his Facebook page, or on YouTube, or on Twitter (@sassephoto).

The tweet below shows another example of Christian’s work:

Bottom line: Milky Way composite image by Christian Sasse.

Read more about Christian Sasse’s photographic process: A novel approach to star trails

Deborah Byrd

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