SpaceSun

Sun activity: Week of June 13, 2022

The sun, seen as a large yellow sphere with small dark spots.
Today’s sun activity with the most active regions labeled (0 UTC on June 20, 2022). Original image, without labels, via NASA SDO. Today’s sun is posted by Armando Caussade. Why are east and west on the sun reversed?

June 19 update: Sun activity low with a bit of solar wind

Today’s sun news: Sun activity continues to be low, with only C-class flares. The largest was a C4.8 flare produced by AR3031 at 21:05 UTC on June 18. This sunspot region continues to be the most productive flaring region. There is an increase in solar wind at Earth due to a coronal hole. This could cause an increase in geomagnetic activity over the next day.
Next 24 hours: The forecast today is for a 90% chance for C flares, 25% for M flares, and 5% for X flares.
Next expected CME: No reports of Earth-directed CMEs.
Current geomagnetic activity: Quiet.

Sun activity: Bright spots on fiercely roiling sphere with many streamers emitted from them.
June 18, 2022. In sun activity today, we can admire the beauty of sunspot regions AR3032 and AR3030. AR3030 (right) is the most active. Image AIA 171 angstrom via SDO.

June 18 update: Sunspot AR3030 main player

Today’s sun news: Sun activity continues low, with only C-class flares. The largest was a C5.7-class flare produced by AR3030 at 11:30 UTC on June 17. This sunspot region produced four out of the nine C-class flares in the past 24 hours. AR3031 continues to be the most magnetically complex region, with the potential for producing more flares. It is now starting to move out of sight, carried around to the far side of the sun by the sun’s rotation. There were some beautiful prominences from the sun’s southwest limb (edge) over the past day. See the Helioviewer video below.

Next 24 hours: The forecast today is for a 90% chance for C flares, 30% for M flares, and 5% for X flares.
Next expected CME: No reports of Earth-directed CMEs.
Current geomagnetic activity: Quiet.

Sun activity: Bright spots on fiercely roiling sphere with many streamers emitted from them.
June 18, 2022. In sun activity today, we can admire the beauty of sunspot regions AR3032 and AR3030. AR3030 (right) is the most active. Image AIA 171 angstrom via SDO.

June 17 update: Sunspot AR3031 promises action

Sun activity is back to low, with mostly C-class flares. AR3031 is the main player and produced the largest flare over the last 24 hours: a C4.7-flare at 00:50 UTC on June 17. Of the nine active regions labeled on our image above, AR3031 is the most magnetically complex, with the potential for producing more flares. There was some minor attenuation of shortwave as seen on the image below at 00:55 UTC on June 17.

June 16 update: Heliophysics Big Year ahead

NASA announced its Heliophysics Big Year (October 2023 to December 2024) yesterday. It’s a global celebration of the sun and its influence on Earth and the rest of the solar system! And it’ll kick off in dramatic fashion, with the annular solar eclipse of October 14, 2023. It’ll include the total solar eclipse on April 8, 2024, which is visible from North America. It’ll end with Parker Solar Probe’s first closest approach to the sun on December 24, 2024. Read more about the Heliophysics Big Year here.

June 15 update: The CME is here

The expected coronal mass ejection (CME) – which left the sun on June 13 as an enormous bubble of superheated gas or plasma – reached the Earth today. At the moment, only a slight geomagnetic disturbance has been recorded. This CME, combined with high speed solar wind from a coronal hole, has caused the Space Weather Prediction Center to issue a a G1 minor geomagnetic storm watch for today. And there are chances for a G2 moderate geomagnetic storm. Will we have an uptick in auroral activity?

Black circle with red circle inside (the sun). This is in a red rectangle with a bright loop on the left (a CME).
Sun activity on June 13, 2022, produced a CME (the big loop on the left in this image) observed by the SOHO/LASCO C2 coronagraph. An Earth is shown for scale inside the loop of the CME. Image via Helioviewer.

June 14 update: CME glancing blow tomorrow and possible auroras

The long-duration M3.43-flare from AR3032 yesterday (June 13, 2022) produced a CME. This CME might provide a glancing blow to Earth’s magnetic field by midday on June 15, according to NOAA computer models (see tweet below). It’s likely to reach Earth at the same time as effects from a coronal hole (see NOAA SWPC image below). If both hit the Earth simultaneously, they might spark a G1 minor – or a G2 moderate – geomagnetic storm. NASA computer models show a similar outcome with an expected arrival earlier on June 15 (see tweet below). All of this means a chance for possible auroras at mid-latitudes on June 15!

June 13 update: Sun activity has picked up

Sun activity picked up early June 13 with an M3.4 flare and an associated CME from new region AR3032. A type II radio burst from the CME shock was observed. The flare produced a temporary short wave radio blackout over East Asia. The CME was intense but appears to have largely headed east of Earth. We await further analysis but it is probably not Earth-directed. The new regions AR3032 and AR3033 formed next to AR3030. Earth also reached G1 geomagnetic storm levels briefly. Analysis should tell us the source of the activity.

Roiling surface of sun in teal and white with bright white splotch labeled M3.4.
Today’s sun activity included an M3.4 solar flare observed by SDO in 131 angstroms. The flare came from AR3032 around 4 UTC on June 13, 2022. Image via SDO.

To our readers and community

We invite you all to send us your beautiful recent photos of sunspots and auroras. We love receiving your photos! To those of you who’ve already posted a photo to our community, thank you.

Submit your image here

The sun, seen as a large orange sphere with a mottled surface.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Mario Rana in Hampton, Virginia, captured this filtered image on June 18, 2022, and wrote: “Hydrogen-alpha image of the sun. Today’s sun featured numerous sunspot regions, and beautiful filaments and prominences!” Thank you, Mario!
The sun, seen as a sectional yellow sphere with a mottled surface.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | David Hoskin in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, captured this filtered image on June 18, 2022, and wrote: “This hydrogen-alpha image shows the area around sunspots AR3032 and AR3030 near the northwest limb of the Sun. The central umbra of the sunspots appear white in this inverted image. The large filament near the center of the image spans nearly a quarter of the sun’s diameter! Dark areas of plage and several nice prominences are also visible.” Thank you, David!
The sun, seen as a sectional monochromatic sphere with a mottled surface.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | Randall Kayfes in Tucson, Arizona, captured this hydrogen-alpha filtered view of the sun on June 15, 2022, and wrote “Our sunspots 3032, 3030, 3033 and 3034 are providing some very nice filaments.” Thank you, Randall!
The sun, seen as a large monochromatic sphere with small dark spots.
View at EarthSky Community Photos. | William Cooke in Carleton Place, Ontario, Canada, made this filtered image on June 14, 2022, and wrote “Having a bit of fun today, tried shooting the sun. Done this in the past to see solar flares and the solar eclipse a number of years back. Don’t do this often but I am amazed at what you can see when you shoot the sun. Taking all the needed precautions when looking toward the sun. Enjoy.” Thank you, William!

Bottom line: June 19, 2022, sun activity: Low. A bit of solar wind is reaching Earth from a coronal hole.

Why are east and west on the sun reversed?

Posted 
June 13, 2022
 in 
Space

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