Top 10 EarthSky science interviews for 2010

The most popular EarthSky science interviews for 2010 as chosen by … you!

1. Dan Doctor on the May 2010 sinkhole in Guatemala City
In late May 2010, a sinkhole suddenly opened up in Guatemala City, swallowing a three-story building and leaving a steep, 100-foot deep hole in the middle of an urban neighborhood.

2. Mark Changizi: Why human eyes see in color
He says that the human eye evolved to see colors in part to glean what another person feels by detecting subtle color changes in their skin.

3. David Helfand on risk from killer asteroids
Asteroid Apophis – about the size of a football stadium – will whisk closely past Earth in 2029. It’s a reminder that killer asteroids are out there.

4. Steven Vogt stands by claim of planet in habitable zone of Gliese 581
Dr. Vogt and his team announced the first planet orbiting in the habitable zone – the zone around a star where a planet might support life as we know it – called Gliese 581g.

5. Kellogg Schwab on human challenges of clean water
Kellogg Schwab told EarthSky that providing clean water and sanitation in the developing world takes more than just engineering water filters or purification systems.

6. Jan Cami on the largest molecule ever found in space
Astronomers have found a large and very special type of molecule in space.

7. Mandy Joye warns of danger of methane gas in Gulf oil plumes
She explains why the high methane concentration in the spilled oil could lead to oxygen depletion in Gulf waters.

8. Philip Landrigan: Everyday chemicals might scramble hormones’ signals
Certain chemicals found in everyday objects might be scrambling our hormones’ sensitive signaling.

9. Doug Finkbeiner: Giant energy bubbles discovered in Milky Way galaxy
In November of 2010, a team of astrophysicists discovered two giant, energy-filled bubbles extending from the galaxy’s center.

10. Kara Lavender Law: Ocean garbage patch in Atlantic, too
Scientists have discovered another ocean region swirling with plastic debris – like the notorious North Pacific Garbage Patch. But this one’s in the Atlantic.

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