Small Magellanic Cloud orbits Milky Way

You need to be in Earth’s Southern Hemisphere to see the Small Magellanic Cloud. It looks like a luminous cloud, but it’s really a dwarf galaxy, orbiting our Milky Way.

Meet the Double Cluster in Perseus

The Double Cluster in the constellation Perseus is a breathtaking pair of star clusters, each containing supergiant suns. How to find it in your sky.

M17 is the Omega Nebula

Near M16 on the sky’s dome is M17, or Messier 17 – aka the Omega Nebula – visible through binoculars and glorious in a low power telescope.

Awesome beauty of the Eagle Nebula

The Eagle Nebula – aka Messier 16 or M16 – is home to several famous structures, including the Pillars of Creation and the Stellar Spire.

M6 and M7 in the Scorpion’s Tail

If you have a dark sky, look for them. They may well be the finest star clusters visible at this time of year.

Find M4 near the Scorpion’s Heart

Look for a fuzzy object near bright Antares. It’s M4, one of the closest globular star clusters to Earth.

Giant star cluster Omega Centauri

All globular star clusters are impressive, but Omega Centauri’s in a class by itself. Sparkling with 10 million stars, it’s the Milky Way’s largest globular.

Crab Nebula

Look for the Crab Nebula

The Crab Nebula, about 6,500 light years from Earth, is the scattered fragments of a supernova, or exploding star, observed by earthly skywatchers in the year 1054.

Messier 8 is the Lagoon Nebula

The Lagoon Nebula aka M8 is the largest and brightest of a number of nebulosities in and around Sagittarius.

The Trifid Nebula, or M20

The Trifid is a famous summertime binocular object. Its name means “divided into three lobes.” If you view this nebula through a telescope, you’ll see why.