Albireo, beloved double star

Albireo is known best for the striking color contrast between its two stars – the brighter gold star and the dimmer blue star.

Eltanin and Rastaban, the Dragon’s Eyes

These 2 famous stars shine down from the northern sky. Eltanin and Rastaban represent the fiery Eyes of the constellation Draco the Dragon.

Antares is the Heart of the Scorpion

Bright red Antares appears in the southeast sky before sunrise in late January/early February. It’s the brightest star in the constellation Scorpius and represents the Scorpion’s Heart.

Zubeneschamali: A green star?

Although some scientists claim stars can’t look green, many stargazers will swear that Zubeneschamali proves otherwise.

Zubenelgenubi is Libra’s alpha star

Now it’s Libra’s alpha star. But Zubenelgenubi is an Arabic name indicating that this star was once perceived as the Southern Claw of Scorpius the Scorpion.

Alphecca, the jewel in the Northern Crown

Alphecca. Gemma. Alpha Coronae Borealis or simply Alpha Cor Bor. They’re all names for one star – the brightest star in the constellation Northern Crown.

Polaris is the North Star

Many people think Polaris is the sky’s brightest star. In fact, Polaris ranks only 50th in brightness. Still, Polaris is famous because the entire northern sky wheels around it.

Thuban is a former Pole Star

Thuban was the Pole Star some 5,000 years ago, when the Egyptians were building the pyramids.

Photo of blue-white star Spica.

Spica is a whirling double star

Spica’s 2 stars orbit a common center of gravity in only 4 days. Their mutual gravity distorts each star into an egg shape, with the pointed ends facing each other.

Observatory dome in foreground, Milky Way in background, and Alpha Centauri's position marked.

Alpha Centauri, star system closest to our sun

We see this nearly star system as a single star in our sky, but it’s really 3 stars. Of the 3, Proxima is closer to our sun than any other known star.