Mirfak is Perseus’ brightest star

Mirfak isn’t as famous as Algol, its brother star in the constellation Perseus. But Mirfak is easier to find and can help guide you to Algol.

Sky chart showing an arrow from Orion's Belt to the star Aldebaran.

Aldebaran is the Bull’s fiery eye

Aldebaran – brightest star in Taurus the Bull – is easy to spot at one tip of a V-shaped pattern of stars. If this star replaced our sun, its surface would extend almost to the orbit of Mercury.

Achernar is the End of the River

Achernar is the 9th brightest star and flattest star known. It’s famous as the southernmost bright star in the constellation Eridanus the River. Here’s why much of Earth never sees it … and how you can.

Hamal is an ancient equinox star

It’s not a super-noticeable star, but Hamal is the brightest star in Aries the Ram and can be found fairly easily. Plus Hamal has a special place in the history of the Earth and sky.

Algol is the Demon Star

What’s the scariest star in all the heavens? Around Halloween, look for Algol – a star named for a demon! How to see it in your sky.

Meet Alpha Cephei, a rapidly rotating star

While not one of the most conspicuous stars in the night sky, Alderamin – aka Alpha Cephei – is easy to spot, and is interesting for its rapid rotation on its axis.

Meet Delta Cephei, a famous variable star

Delta Cephei doubles in brightness on a precise schedule, every 5.36 days. Its brightness changes are tied to its absolute brightness. Learn how this star helped establish the known distance scale of our galaxy and universe.

A darkened skyline, with smoke from a chimney blowing sideways and a single star, Fomalhaut, above.

Fomalhaut: The loneliest star

It’s also sometimes called the autumn star for us in the Northern Hemisphere. In its large dark patch of sky, only Fomalhaut shines brightly. Here’s how to see it.

Altair: Bright star of the Eagle

Altair is only 16.8 light-years from Earth, making it one of our closest stellar neighbors. At least 2 features of the star make it distinctive. For one thing, Altair needs only 10 hours to spin once on its axis, in contrast to roughly a month for our sun.

61 Cygni is the Flying Star

Although it’s not bright, 61 Cygni moves exceptionally rapidly against the background of more distant stars. Its motion reveals its nearness to Earth.