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Watch for moon, Jupiter, Orion on night of November 21

Moon, Jupiter, orion the hunter at mid-evening November 21. Read more

Tonight for November 21, 2013

Our sky chart shows the eastern sky as it looks from North American mid-northern latitudes around 8 to 9 p.m. on November 21, 2013. But no matter where you reside worldwide, you can expect the moon and Jupiter to rise in tandem above your east-northeast horizon roughly three to four hours after sundown on November 21. The farther south you live, the later that the sun sets, so the moon and Jupiter rise at a later hour at more southerly latitudes. At temperate latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere, you won’t see the moon and Jupiter until late evening or close to midnight.

As seen from mid-northern latitudes, Jupiter and the constellation Orion climb over the horizon at roughly the same time. Look for Orion to the south (right) of Jupiter before going to bed tonight.

November 2013 guide to the five visible planets

See the three medium-bright stars at the center of the constellation Orion?  Those three stars are Orion's Belt, and they're very recognizable.  Plus, if you keep watching long enough for Orion to rise high enough in the sky, you'll find that the three Belt stars of Orion always point to Sirius, the Dog Star and sky's brightest star.

See the three medium-bright stars at the center of the constellation Orion? Those three stars are Orion’s Belt, and they’re very recognizable. Plus, if you keep watching long enough for Orion to rise high enough in the sky, you’ll find that the three Belt stars of Orion always point to Sirius, the Dog Star and sky’s brightest star.

View larger. | EarthSky Facebook friend Mike Taylor caught this beautiful shot of Orion and the moon rising over the Atlantic Ocean on Maryland's eastern shore, late at night, earlier in 2013.  This image has been processed through Lightroom 4 & Photoshop CS5.  Thank you, Mike!  Visit Mike Taylor Photography.

View larger. | EarthSky Facebook friend Mike Taylor caught this beautiful shot of Orion and the moon rising over the Atlantic Ocean on Maryland’s eastern shore, late at night, earlier in 2013. He processed the image through Lightroom 4 & Photoshop CS5. Thank you, Mike! Visit Taylor Photography.

At more southerly latitudes, Orion rises before the moon and Jupiter do. Near the equator, Orion rises an hour or so before the moon and Jupiter. At temperate latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere, the moon and Jupiter won’t rise for a few hours after Orion appears over the eastern horizon.

And, of course, Orion isn’t the only constellation near the very bright planet Jupiter on November 21.

You can use Jupiter to locate the constellation Gemini and its two brightest stars: Castor and Pollux. Jupiter will be shining in front of the constellation Gemini for many months to come.

When the moon drops out of the evening sky in the last week of November 2013, let the brilliant planet Jupiter show you the constellation Gemini in all its starlit majesty!

When the moon drops out of the evening sky in the last week of November 2013, let the brilliant planet Jupiter show you the constellation Gemini in all its starlit majesty!

Bottom line: Use the waning gibbous moon to find the brilliant planet Jupiter on the night of November 21, 2013. Then rely on Jupiter to guide you to the constellation Gemini and its two brightest stars, Castor and Pollux, for months to come.

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Orion rises at mid-evening in November and early December