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Big Dipper high in north on June evenings

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Tonight for June 5, 2014

At this time of year, assuming you’re in the Northern Hemisphere, you can easily find the legendary Big Dipper asterism, called The Plough by our friends in the UK, now high in the north during the evening hours.

It’s one of the most familiar star patterns in the sky because its shape really resembles a dipper.

The two outer stars in the bowl of the Big Dipper always point to Polaris, the North Star.  Image by EarthSky Facebook friend Abhijit Juvekar.

The two outer stars in the bowl of the Big Dipper always point to Polaris, the North Star. Image by EarthSky Facebook friend Abhijit Juvekar.

Less familiar – and tougher to find – is the Little Dipper. Here’s how you can find it.

First, locate the Big Dipper in the northern sky during the evening hours. Notice that the Big Dipper has two parts: a bowl and a handle. See the two outer stars in the bowl? They’re known as The Pointers because they point to the North Star, which is also known as Polaris.

Once you’ve found Polaris, you can find the Little Dipper. Polaris marks the end of the handle of the Little Dipper. You need a dark night to see the Little Dipper in full, because it’s so much fainter than its larger and brighter counterpart.

Look for the Big Dipper high in the north at nightfall!