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EarthSky // Today's Image Release Date: Jul 08, 2014

Typhoon Neoguri on July 7

Before it lost its status as a super typhoon, meteorologists were using words like “monster” and “beast” to describe Neoguri. This image shows you why.

Super Typhoon Neoguri is huge.  Here it is on July 7, 2014, via NASA satellite

Typhoon Neoguri on July 7, 2014. Late Monday, its winds weakened.

Neoguri lost its super typhoon status yesterday afternoon when dry air to west of the system weakened it. Prior to that weakening, meteorologists were using words like monster and beast to describe Neoguri, which, despite it slower wind speed, tore past the Philippines and buffeted Japan’s Okinawa Islands last night. The image above shows Neoguri on July 7, 2014. It hurtled across the Pacific as a massive storm, and as one point was expected to be the largest typhoon to have struck Japan in the month of July, ever. No more, though. It’s still expected to make landfall in Japan on July 9.

Read more: Typhoon Neoguri pounds Okinawa, moves on

Proportional size Super Typhoon Neoguri and Jupiter's Great Red Spot.  In real terms, Jupiter's Red Spot spans four planet Earths.

Proportional size of Super Typhoon Neoguri (when it was super) and Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. In real terms, Jupiter’s Red Spot spans four planet Earths. Image via @PeterGleick on Twitter.

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