Enjoying EarthSky? Subscribe.

221,521 subscribers and counting ...

See it! Star Aldebaran near the moon

On Sunday, as seen from North America, the moon “occulted” or passed in front of the star Aldebaran. Many then saw Aldebaran near the moon Sunday evening.

Jacob Baker wrote:

Jacob Baker wrote: “Reappearance of Aldebaran after lunar occultation. Reappeared at 7:58 p.m. in Fall River, Massachusetts. Taken through a small reflector telescope in the backyard.”

Fernando Roquel in Caguas Puerto caught Aldebaran after the occultation, when it re-emerged from behind the moon.

Fernando Roquel in Caguas Puerto caught Aldebaran after the occultation, when it re-emerged from behind the moon.

Greg Hogan caught the moon and Aldebaran from Kathleen, Georgia.

Greg Hogan caught the moon and Aldebaran from Kathleen, Georgia.

Pablo Olivares caught the moon and Aldebaran from Caracas, Venezuela.

Pablo Olivares caught the moon and Aldebaran from Caracas, Venezuela.

Michael Holland in Gibsonia, Florida, wrote:

Michael Holland in Gibsonia, Florida, wrote: “Thanks to all the staff here at EarthSky. I caught the moon and Alderbaran after reading my daily email from April 10th.”

Moon and Aldebaran on April 10, 2016 from Charlie Barrett in New Haven, Connecticut.

Moon and Aldebaran on April 10, 2016 from Charlie Barrett in New Haven, Connecticut.

Patrick Casaert - in Meaux, near Paris, France - saw Aldebaran and the moon this way.

Patrick Casaert – in Meaux, near Paris, France – saw Aldebaran and the moon this way.

Cindy Gurmann wrote on April 10:

Cindy Gutmann wrote on April 10: “Looked out my window just now and there was the waning crescent moon with a bit of earthshine and Aldebaran to its lower right.”

View larger. | Eliot Herman in Tucson caught Aldebaran and the moon in daylight, just as the star was about to disappear behind the moon's disk.

View larger. | Eliot Herman in Tucson was struggling with incoming clouds when caught Aldebaran and the moon in daylight, just as the star was about to disappear behind the moon’s disk. The star can be seen in the lower right of the photo.

Deborah Byrd

MORE ARTICLES