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Larry Sessions
11Dec01_430

Focus on stars Betelgeuse and Rigel

Many constellations have a bright star, but Orion has two: Rigel and Betelgeuse.

This ground-based image of the Large Magellanic Cloud was taken by German astrophotographer Eckhard Slawik. Image via ESA

The spectacular Large Magellanic Cloud

From tropical or Southern Hemisphere latitudes, the Large Magellanic Cloud is easy to see. Look for it in the evening from December to April.

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Super effect on us from a supermoon?

A supermoon’s pull of gravity creates higher-than-usual tides. But gravity doesn’t affect a human body as much as it does an ocean tide.

Achernar is flattened because it rotates rapidly

Achernar is the End of the River

Achernar – also known as Alpha Eridani – is the 9th brightest star in Earth’s sky and the flattest star known.

Beautiful shot of a first quarter moon from EarthSky community member Patrick Casaert of La Lune The Moon.

Quarter moon or a half moon?

Half the moon always faces us. And half the moon is always lit by the sun. But, in the language of astronomers, there are no ‘half moons.’

Via Wikimedia Commons

Seeing things that aren’t there

Seeing animals in clouds, or a face in the moon, are examples of pareidolia. Look here for photos to test your own ability to see things that aren’t there.

Image via NASA.

Small Magellanic Cloud orbits our galaxy

Small Magellanic Cloud resembles a luminous cloud, but it’s really a dwarf galaxy, orbiting our Milky Way. Here’s how to see it, from Earth’s Southern Hemisphere.

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Shedding light on the moon’s dark side

A far side of the moon remains hidden from Earth, but doesn’t stay permanently dark.

Alpheratz looks like one star to the eye, but spectroscopic analysis reveals that it is two stars. Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Alpheratz is part of the Great Square

Come to know this star and be one step further along the path of finding the Andromeda galaxy.

This image shows the debris ring around Fomalhaut and the location of its first known planet. This is the actual discovery image, published in the journal Science in November, 2008. Fomalhaut b was the first beyond our solar system visible to the eye in photographic images. Image via Hubble Space Telescope.

Fomalhaut had first visible exoplanet

Fomalhaut is sometimes called the Loneliest Star. Its planet, Fomalhaut b, was the first planet beyond our solar system to be visible to the human eye.