Enjoying EarthSky? Subscribe.

231,603 subscribers and counting ...

The spectacular Large Magellanic Cloud

From tropical or Southern Hemisphere latitudes, the Large Magellanic Cloud is easy to see. Look for it in the evening from December to April.

Landing on Mars is hard

Mars’ atmospheric pressure is less than 1% that of Earth, so spacecraft come down hard. Europe has been trying for a Mars’ soft landing since 2003. How they plan to succeed.

Why were prehistoric insects so huge?

Before the dinosaurs, giant insects ruled the world more than 300 million years ago.

Human ancestor Lucy a tree climber

Lucy lived 3.18 million years ago in what’s now Ethiopia. An analysis of high-resolution CT scans of her fossilized skeleton shows she was equipped for climbing trees.

More From Latest
keyboard_arrow_down

Star clusters seen spewing out dust

UCLA astronomers confirm that stars are responsible for producing dust on a galactic scale, a finding that’s consistent with long-standing theories.

Gravity waves over China

Gravity waves traveling upwards from the lower atmosphere caused this unusual banded structure in airglow above China in late November.

Astronomers see giant galaxy being born

The Spiderweb Galaxy – which spans some 3 times the diameter of our Milky Way – is forming inside a cluster of protogalaxies, in a dense soup of molecular gas.

See it! Moon sweeps past Venus

The moon passed Venus Friday evening, but there’s more to come. Wonderful photos here! Thanks to all who submitted. Keep watching this post for more photos.

The circadian rhythm of our microbes

Like most life on Earth, our gut microbes have their own circadian rhythm. Disrupting that daily routine can be bad – and keeping it in balance can be good – for whole body.

Mystery of sun’s coronal heating

Exploding “heat bombs” might explain why the sun’s upper atmosphere, or corona, sizzles at millions of degrees – hundreds of times hotter than at the surface.

It’s a bird, a plane, the tiniest asteroid!

Asteroid 2015 TC25 is small enough to be straddled by a person, reminiscent of the iconic bomb-riding scene in the movie Dr. Strangelove. It swept between us and the moon a year ago.

What’s the hottest Earth has ever been?

Earth’s hottest periods occurred before humans existed. Those ancient climates would have been like nothing our species has ever seen.

Star of the week: Hamal

Hamal, also known as Alpha Arietis, is the brightest star in Aries the Ram. Learn the role this star played in defining the term First Point in Aries.