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Human World

Photo credit: Curtis Beaird
Science Wire | Jul 16, 2015

We love sunflowers! Your best photos

Sunflowers say summertime, yes?

ice-skating-coppers
Science Wire | Jul 15, 2015

We’re not heading into mini ice age

Any drop in solar activity will be dwarfed by the impact of increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, says Jim Wild of Lancaster University.

cropped- new-horizons-mission-team-women
Science Wire | Jul 14, 2015

The women of New Horizons’ Pluto flyby

Women make up 25 percent of the New Horizons flyby team. Science team leader Fran Bagenal said, “This isn’t remarkable – it’s just how it is.”

Telstar, via NASA
This Date in Science | Jul 10, 2015

This date in science: First Telstar launch

Telstar was the first satellite able to relay television signals between Europe and North America. It launched on this date … and helped change the world.

Don’t fence me in: a coyote finds Portland, Oregon a perfectly good habitat. Photo credit: automotocycle/flickr
Science Wire | Jul 08, 2015

Urban wildlife is here to stay

Cities adapt to growing ranks of coyotes, cougars and other urban wildlife

fireworks_flickr_300
Science Wire | Jul 02, 2015

How do fireworks get their colors?

The colors in fireworks help create “ohhhhs” and “ahhhhs.” But what creates the colors?

clock_almost_midnight
Science Wire | Jun 29, 2015

Leap second scheduled for June 30

World timekeepers will add one extra second on June 30, 2015. Meanwhile, a proposal to dump the leap second has been deferred until October.

Just how quickly are those thoughts bouncing around in there? Image credit: shutterstock
Science Wire | Jun 29, 2015

What is the speed of thought?

It feels instantaneous, but how long does it really take to think a thought?

wine_glasses
FAQs | Videos | Jun 27, 2015

Can a human singing voice shatter glass?

Not just any loud sound will shatter a glass. It has to be the right resonant frequency.

MIT researchers have successfully cooled a gas of sodium potassium (NaK) molecules to a temperature of 500 nanokelvin. llustration credit: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT
Science Wire | Jun 24, 2015

MIT scientists set record for coldest molecule

Scientists have cooled a molecule down to 500-billionths of a degree above absolute zero, a million times colder than interstellar space.