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Celebrating science, the Earth and the sky

Earth Day and the March for Science, April 22. International Dark Sky Week, April 22-28. Links and resources for all 3, here.

Image via YouTube

Earth Day and March for Science on April 22. April 22, 2017 will be the most political Earth Day in some years. The Earth Day Network and the March for Science are co-organizing a rally and teach-in on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. on April 22. The day’s program will include speeches and trainings with scientists and civic organizers, musical performances, and a march through the streets of Washington, D.C. The crowd will gather at 8 a.m., and the teach-in will begin at 10 a.m.

Click for more about Earth Day / March for Science in Washington DC

Speakers and schedule of events for Earth Day / March for Science

Click here to find a satellite March for Science in your area.

No interest in the marches? Just want to celebrate Earth? Here are some ideas:

NASA invites you to celebrate Earth Day 2017 by virtually adopting a piece of Earth as seen from space.

17 Earth Day ideas from Pinterest

50 Earth Day activities for kids from TinkerLab

10 awesome eco-activities to do this Earth Day from Inhabit

We celebrate Earth Day on April 22 for a very specific reason. The first Earth Day – April 22, 1970 – was celebrated on Arbor Day, which began in Nebraska in 1872. The most common practice on Arbor Day was the planting of trees. Today we still celebrate Earth Day on April 22, and planting trees is still a common practice and a great way to celebrate the day.

March for Science sign ideas via the American Society for Cell Biology

International Dark Sky Week, April 18-22. Created in 2003 by high-school student Jennifer Barlow, International Dark Sky Week has grown to become a worldwide event and a key component of Global Astronomy Month. Each year it is held in April around Earth Day and Astronomy Day. This year celebrations begin Saturday, April 22 and run through Friday, April 28. In explaining why she started the week, Barlow said:

I want people to be able to see the wonder of the night sky without the effects of light pollution. The universe is our view into our past and our vision into the future … I want to help preserve its wonder.

International Dark Sky Week draws attention to the problems associated with light pollution and promotes simple solutions available to mitigate it.

Click here for resources to help you celebrate International Dark Sky Week

Also read: 5 Ways to Celebrate Dark Sky Week

Bottom line: International Dark Sky Week, April 18-22. Earth Day and the March for Science, April 22. Links and resources for all 3, here.

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Deborah Byrd

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