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| | | Earth | Human World on May 18, 2014

This date in science: Dramatic space photos of Pavlof Volcano

As Pavlof Volcano poured out lava and ash, ISS astronauts managed to capture these seldom-seen oblique views of the volcano.

May 18, 2013. On this date astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured three beautiful views of Pavlof Volcano, part of the Aleutian Arc, with a handheld Nikon D3S digital camera. As the volcano poured out lava and shot ash 20,000 feet (6,000 meters) into the air, the astronauts managed to capture these seldom-seen oblique views of the volcano, which are very different from the top-down views of most unmanned satellites.

Pavlof Volcano May 18, 2013 via ISS

Pavlof Volcano May 18, 2013 via ISS. The space station was about 475 miles south-southeast of the volcano when astronauts aboard captured this beautiful, oblique view. Photo provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. Image taken by the Expedition 36 crew.

Pavlof Volcano May 18, 2013 via ISS

Pavlof Volcano May 18, 2013 via ISS. This volcano is located about 625 miles (1,000 kilometers) southwest of Anchorage. In May 2013, its volcanic plume extended southeastward over the North Pacific Ocean. Photo provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. Image taken by the Expedition 36 crew.

Pavlof Volcano May 18, 2013 via ISS

Pavlof Volcano May 18, 2013 via ISS. The volcano had begun its eruption on May 13, 2013. Photo provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. Image taken by the Expedition 36 crew.

Via NASA Earth Observatory