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eclipse-music-video-Hamfero-Faroe Islands-3-20-2015
Science Wire | May 25, 2015

Most dramatic music video ever

Recorded live by the doom metal band Hamferð during the March 20, 2015 total eclipse of the sun above the village of Kvívík in the Faroe Islands.

Octopus tentacle via Shutterstock.
Science Wire | May 25, 2015

An octopus senses light with its skin

New research shows an octopus can change skin color in response to light, without input from the eye or brain.

lightning
Science Wire | May 22, 2015

Scared of thunder and lightning? You have astraphobia

Bam! Yikes! Do you – and your dog – have astraphobia?

dinosaur-saurornitholestes-sullivani-2015-cp
Science Wire | May 21, 2015

Newly named dinosaur had a keen nose

It was a fierce predator, “not a dinosaur you’d want to mess with,” said the scientist whose analysis of an ancient skull revealed a brand new species.

Orcas can leap!  Photo via Marinebio.org
Science Wire | May 21, 2015

Video: Paddle boarders meet orcas

Imagine you’re paddle-boarding, and an orca – killer whale – pops up on the ocean surface near you. Two amazing and beautiful videos, here.

Sonia Harmand at excavation site.
Science Wire | May 20, 2015

Oldest stone tools found in Kenya

The tools, whose makers may or may not have been some sort of human ancestor, date back to 3.3 million years ago.

greenland-fishingboat-300
Blogs | May 20, 2015

North Atlantic circulation slowing down already?

A predicted global warming effect is a slowdown in North Atlantic Ocean circulation. New research shows recent decreases that are unprecedented in the past 1,100 years.

The Opah, via NOAA Fisheries
Science Wire | May 20, 2015

Opah, the first truly warm-blooded fish

It circulates heated blood through its body as mammals and birds do. Its warm blood makes the opah a high-performance predator that swims faster, sees better.

Blood Falls in Antarctica via ScienceNow in 2009
Science Wire | May 18, 2015

Origin of Antarctica’s eerie Blood Falls

New work confirms zones of liquid salt water hundreds of meters below the bright red waterfall in icy Antarctica, known as Blood Falls.

Sea surface temperature anomalies, or differences from averages, in Celsius for February-March 2014. Image credit: NOAA
Science Wire | May 18, 2015

Pacific ‘blob’ is changing weather patterns

What does this year’s odd U.S. weather have in common with a huge spike in hungry, stranded sea lion pups on California shores? Both are linked to a giant patch of warm ocean water.